Wake up to the sound of music videos on your iPhone

Ringtones are passé; why not wake up to the sound of a music video in the morning? You’ll be the envy of everyone who hears your alarm go off with this neat iOS 9 feature. Here’s how to enable it. First off, you’ll need some music videos. The best way is to head into iTunes […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)


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Dropbox Shutting Down Mailbox and Carousel in Early 2016

Dropbox has announced that it will be shutting down popular email and photo sharing apps Mailbox and Carousel on February 26, 2016 and March 31, 2016 respectively.

Dropbox originally acquired Mailbox in March 2013, and launched Carousel in April 2014. The company says it will be communicating directly with users of both apps in the coming days.

Dropbox:

The Carousel and Mailbox teams have built products that are loved by many people and their work will continue to have an impact. We’ll be taking key features from Carousel back to the place where your photos live—in the Dropbox app. We’ll also be using what we’ve learned from Mailbox to build new ways to communicate and collaborate on Dropbox (you can see early signs of this focus with Paper).

Mailbox:

…As we deepened our focus on collaboration, we realized there’s only so much an email app can do to fundamentally fix email. We’ve come to believe that the best way for us to improve people’s productivity going forward is to streamline the workflows that generate so much email in the first place.

Carousel:

When we introduced Carousel in April 2014, we believed a standalone app would be a better way to experience photos. We’re proud to have created a photo app that many of you use and love. However, over the past year and a half, we’ve learned the vast majority of our users prefer the convenience and simplicity of interacting with their photos directly inside of Dropbox.

Dropbox says it will be integrating key features from Mailbox and Carousel into its cloud storage service.

Tags: Dropbox, Carousel, Mailbox
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Embedded iPad helps artist really get into his work

A painting by artist Jorge Pardo is taking work away from bull-slinging gallery explainers. The piece, which is currently showing at Art Basel in Miami, depicts an impressionist version of the artist on a slide at a water park. It comes from a photograph his daughter took and looks really cool, but that’s not the […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)


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Griffin Review: The Guide Cable Management Set Will Keep Your Desk Organized

Griffin’s Guide Magnetic Cable Management Set was first announced at CES in January of 2015, but it didn’t become available for purchase until September. We went hands-on with the Guide to see if it was worth the wait as a cable management solution.

The Guide Cable Management Set is modular and consists of three weighted bases and three magnetic aluminum cable anchors that attach to the bases. Each base is made from a polished stainless steel with a shiny finish while the anchors, available in three sizes from small to large, are made from an anodized copper-colored aluminum.

Together, the Guide system looks great on a desk, but it is only available in the polished steel and copper colorway, which doesn’t match any iOS devices and while neutral, may not match all office and room decors. I liked the design of the Guide, but I did wish it was available in a wider selection of colors.

Each of the three bases is the same size, measuring in at 2.28 x 1.98 inches, but the magnetic cable anchors come in a range of sizes to fit different cords. The smallest of the three anchors is sized to fit a single iPhone cable, while the middle one can hold several iPhone-sized cables or a couple of larger cables, and the biggest anchor can hold thicker cables like those for cameras and other electronics. The weight of the Guide bases will keep them in place, but there’s also a non-skid material on the bottom to provide even more traction.

Because the anchors attach to each base using magnets, they can be arranged in multiple ways. One anchor can be used per base or multiple anchors can fit on a single base to meet various cable management needs. For my work space, I used the smaller one to hold an iPhone cable that has a pesky habit of slipping off the edge of the desk, while I used the other two to hold my MacBook cable and cables for other devices in place.

Due to their weight, the Guide bases can’t realistically be mounted on walls or on the sides of desks and tables (and the Guide doesn’t come with the necessary hardware) so these are going to be limited to on-the-desk organization. For that use case, the Guide is primarily going to keep your cables where you want them to be so they’re not sliding all over the desk or slipping off. The Guide isn’t going to hide or conceal cables and cords, but it will keep them looking more organized and streamlined.

The large base size means the Guide takes up more room on a desk than simpler cable routing options, but sacrificing the extra space felt worth it to me both for the versatility of being able to rearrange the pieces at will and for the premium aesthetic. If you have multiple cables in different areas, such as on a desk and on a nightstand, the Guide can also be split up across multiple rooms. After some experimentation, I found the Guide to be more useful for me when split up, because a single larger cable anchor can hold multiple cables in place, letting me address several problem areas.

Given the usefulness of the Guide’s interchangeable pieces, I’m surprised there aren’t more magnetic cable management systems on the market. Before the Guide, I hadn’t considered magnets as cable organizing solution, but it seems like an ideal way to wrangle cables.

Bottom Line

The magnetic Guide system is a clever way to organize cables on a desk, and because it can be used in so many ways, it’s suitable for a range of cable configurations and setups. Since it’s magnetic, it’s easy to arrange and rearrange cables and the Guide system as necessary, and its industrial look blends in with a lot of decors.

If you’ve got pesky cables that are continually slipping off of your desk or getting tangled and knocked out of place, the Guide is going to keep them where they belong with no problem.

The only real negative with the Guide is the price. At $40, this is a somewhat expensive solution to manage a handful of cables, and I do wish it was either more reasonably priced or had more pieces. If you don’t mind shelling out $40 in the name of desktop organization, the Guide is worth picking up.

How to Buy

Griffin’s Guide cable organizers can be purchased from the Griffin website for $39.99 or from Amazon.com for the same price.

Tags: review, Griffin, Griffin Guide
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HomeKit makes Philips Hue smartbulbs even cooler

If you’re even slightly interested in having smart lighting for your house, the new Philips Hue bridge, which supports Apple’s HomeKit automated-home framework, should be in your shopping cart right now. Controlling your lights from your phone is one level of crazy future-stuff, but doing it with your voice drops you into an episode of […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)


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As Apple boasts about Music, Spotify takes App Store’s top spot

Tim Cook may like the “runway” for Apple Music’s take off, but it’s Spotify currently soaring. Apple’s competitor in the music streaming business found itself in the No. 1 position on the iPhone App Store’s Top Grossing charts for the first time in the U.S. This on the same day, Apple CEO Cook told the […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)


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Samsung building robot army to replace human factory workers

Samsung has received a multi-million dollar investment from the South Korean government to develop factory robots to help win manufacturing work currently being lost to cheap human labor in China. Samsung will build the precision speed reducers, motors, controllers, and sensor encoders needed to bring the robots to market. The plan is for them to […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)


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