Jony Ive and Jimmy Iovine to Speak at Vanity Fair ‘New Establishment’ Summit in October

Vanity Fair today announced its speaker lineup for the 2015 New Establishment Summit, revealing that Apple Chief Design Officer Jony Ive as well as Beats cofounder Jimmy Iovine will be attending as speakers. This is the second year in a row Ive is attending as a speaker.

Last year, Ive detailed Apple’s design process in his talk, explaining that he and his fellow designers gather around tables like the ones in Apple retail stores to draw and meet three or four times a week. He also noted that their ideas don’t come along until after the team creates physical objects based on their drawings. Additionally, and perhaps most interesting, Ive said that when Chinese manufacturer Xioami copies its designs what it’s really doing is theft.

The summit takes place from October 5 to 7 at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco and promises „two full days of inventive programming and inspiring conversations around the ideas and innovations shaping the future.“ The summit will kick off with a showing of the new Steven Spielberg film „Bridge of Spies,“ starring Tom Hanks. Other speakers include Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg, Disney’s Bob Iger, film director J.J. Abrams and Steve Jobs biographer Walter Isaacson. The entire speaking lineup can be viewed at Vanity Fair’s website while a full schedule will be revealed soon.



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Jony Ive will offer another peek behind Apple curtain at Vanity Fair Summit

Jony Ive seemed embarrassed when Vanity Fair’s Graydon Carter started their interview by calling Ive the “greatest industrial designer in the world right now.” The Apple design guru closed his eyes, rubbed his head, and then provided a soft-spoken but enlightening 25-minute peek inside his head during 2014’s Vanity Fair New Establishment Summit. Wonder what […]

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How Apple inspired the design of Force Awakens’ new stormtroopers

Apple’s influence on the upcoming Star Wars: The Force Awakens extends far beyond Kylo Ren’s ugly crossguard lightsaber. The Force Awakens costume designer Michael Kaplan has designed costumes on movies like Blade Runner and Fight Club, but when it came…Read more ›



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Industrial Designer Marc Newson to Join Apple Under Jony Ive

Designer Marc Newson is joining Apple, under the leadership of design head Jony Ive, reports Vanity Fair. Newson is a well-known industrial designer who has created a range of items for luxury retailers, and his work has even been shown off at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

Newson has created everything from furniture to eye glasses, and his has been described by Vanity Fair as having a „love of color and of sensual curves,“ with his work taking on a „futuristic, vaguely Jetson-like flair.“

Mark Newson with Bono and Jonathan Ive
Newson is a longtime friend of Jony Ive. Last year, Ive and Newson teamed up to create a range of products for an auction to benefit Product (RED), including an aluminum desk, a Leica camera, and a set of solid gold EarPods, among other items.

„Marc is without question one of the most influential designers of this generation,“ Ive said in a statement provided to VF Daily. „He is extraordinarily talented. We are particularly excited to formalize our collaboration as we enjoy working together so much and have found our partnership so effective.“

According to the report, Newson will continue to be based in the United Kingdom, but will make frequent trips to the company’s Cupertino headquarters. Newson is also said to have collaborated on some designs for Apple earlier this year, before joining the company.

While Newson will work under Jony Ive, it is unclear which specific projects he will take on. When asked if he would work on the iWatch, Apple declined to comment.




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Samsung’s ‘Infringe First and Stall as Long as Possible’ Strategies Are Nothing New

On the day that a San Jose jury submitted a final verdict on the damages that Samsung owes Apple in the second United States patent infringement lawsuit between the two companies, Vanity Fair has published a lengthy piece that takes a look at Samsung’s long (and successful) history of using patent infringement as a business tactic.

Back in 2010, before Apple filed an initial lawsuit against Samsung, executives from Cupertino (including lawyers) met with Samsung executives in Seoul, where it was made clear by Samsung VP Seungho Ahn if Apple chose to pursue a lawsuit, Samsung would countersue with its own patents. „We’ve been building cell phones forever,“ Ahn told Chip Lutton, an Apple lawyer at the time. „We have our own patents, and Apple is probably violating some of those.“

The iPhone compared to the Samsung Galaxy S
As it turns out, stealing key ideas from other companies and then using its own portfolio of patents to draw out lawsuits is a tactic that Samsung used long before Apple came into the picture.

According to various court records and people who have worked with Samsung, ignoring competitors’ patents is not uncommon for the Korean company. And once it’s caught it launches into the same sort of tactics used in the Apple case: countersue, delay, lose, delay, appeal, and then, when defeat is approaching, settle.

In 2007, Sharp filed a lawsuit against Samsung, alleging that the South Korean company had violated its patents. Samsung countersued, drawing out the lawsuit as it continued to produce TV sets using the stolen technology, building up its TV business. Samsung was found guilty of patent infringement years later in 2009, at which point it settled with Sharp to avoid an import ban.

There’s a similar story with Pioneer, who filed a patent infringement lawsuit against Samsung over plasma television technology in 2006. Samsung countersued, dragging on litigation and appeals until a 2009 settlement. The long and expensive legal battle caused Pioneer to shut down its television business while Samsung thrived. Samsung has pulled the same stunt with Kodak, Apple, and several other technology companies.

Samsung hit Apple with the same tactic following the release of the iPhone. As has been documented during the ongoing global lawsuits between the two companies, Samsung evaluated the iPhone feature-by-feature and came up with 126 instances where Apple’s iPhone was better than its own offerings, which led to the development of the Galaxy S.

Bit by bit, the new model for a Samsung smartphone began to look–and function–just like the iPhone. Icons on the home screen had similarly rounded corners, size, and false depth created by a reflective shine across the image. The icon for the phone function went from being a drawing of a keypad to a virtually identical reproduction of the iPhone’s image of a handset. The bezel with the rounded corners, the glass spreading out across the entire face of the phone, the home button at the bottom–all of it almost the same.

Following the release of the Galaxy S and Samsung’s refusal to sign licensing agreements with Apple due to its former history of successfully avoiding significant penalties for copying intellectual property, Apple filed its first lawsuit against Samsung. Samsung, of course, followed, leading to where we are today – Samsung has thus far been ordered to pay Apple just over a billion dollars in the United States after two lawsuits, but appeals are far from over. Samsung has continued to develop its Galaxy line of devices and has cemented itself as Apple’s biggest competitor.

Meanwhile, as has happened with other cases where Samsung violated a company’s patents, it has continued to develop new and better phones throughout the litigation to the point where even some people who have worked with Apple say the Korean company is now a strong competitor on the technology and not just a copycat anymore.

The full story, which covers Samsung’s history, its past patent lawsuits and other legal woes, Apple’s creation of the original iPhone, and the dispute between the two companies, can be read over at Vanity Fair.




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Jony Ive and Designer Marc Newson Interviewed on Charlie Rose Show

Following a discussion about the duo’s design vision and obsession with perfection in a Vanity Fair article last month, Apple’s senior vice president of design Jonathan Ive and industrial designer Marc Newson appeared on the Charlie Rose show last night, with airings of the interview occurring last night on PBS and again tonight on Bloomberg TV.

Left to right: Marc Newson, Jony Ive, and Charlie Rose (Source: @charlierose)

Simplicty is refining and being able to define the very essence of what something does, and therefore you understand what it is and you understand what it does….but simplicity for us, it’s not just the absence of clutter, it’s not just stuff that’s not there, it’s this tremendous gravity to trying to find that very simple solution.

Bloomberg has also posted a short clip of the interview:

Ive and Newson have collaborated numerous times throughout the past few months to select and customize products for Sotheby’s charity auction to benefit Product (RED), including a one-of-a-kind Leica camera, an aluminum desk, solid gold Apple EarPods, and a one-of-a-kind red Mac Pro. Product (RED) has been a longtime Apple partner, with the company raising more than $65 million for the charity since 2006. The two had previously appeared in a video discussing the auction and their role in it.





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Jony Ive Talks About The Essence Of Design And Making His Own Leica

A couple days ago we showed you a custom Leica camera designed by none other than Jony Ive. The camera will be auctioned to raise money for Bono’s Product (Red), a campaign Apple has partnered with for years to fight the spreading of H.I.V. in Africa (if you’ve ever bought a red iPod, you’ve helped contribute). […]

The post Jony Ive Talks About The Essence Of Design And Making His Own Leica appeared first on Cult of Mac.




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