At NeXT, Steve Jobs was “obsessed” with returning to Apple

In a recent interview, tech investor Steve Jurvetson said that, while in exile at NeXT, Steve Jobs remained obsessed about coming back to Apple. The interview was conducted by Bloomberg’s Emily Chang, who sat down with the venture capitalist and Space X and Tesla investor. The money quote about Jobs comes around the three minute […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)


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At NeXT, Steve Jobs was “obsessed” with returning to Apple

ResearchKit apps are now available outside the U.S.

ResearchKit has already helped scientist make some breakthroughs in the study of diseases like Parkinsons, but the apps powered by Apple’s open-source health software haven’t been made available internationally. Starting today, iOS users in the U.K. and Hong Kong can get in on the ResearchKit action too, thanks to the MyHearth Counts app, which was […]

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ResearchKit apps are now available outside the U.S.

ResearchKit Receives Thousands of Sign-Ups Following Launch

Less than twenty-four hours after Apple unveiled ResearchKit, the open source medical framework has received thousands of sign-ups, according to Bloomberg. The report claims that Stanford University researchers awoke on Tuesday morning, the day after Apple’s „Spring Forward“ media event, to discover that 11,000 people signed up for MyHeart Counts, a cardiovascular disease app built using ResearchKit.

“To get 10,000 people enrolled in a medical study normally, it would take a year and 50 medical centers around the country,” said Alan Yeung, medical director of Stanford Cardiovascular Health. “That’s the power of the phone.”

ResearchKit is an open source software framework aimed at revolutionizing medical studies by making them more readily available to millions of iPhone users worldwide. When given permission, the framework uses the iPhone’s various sensors to collect user data such as weight, blood pressure, glucose levels and asthma inhaler use, information that Apple hopes will open up new possibilities for researchers.

Apple will also enable users to answer surveys and input data directly from ResearchKit apps, although researchers caution that information collected from an iPhone user may be misleading due to various potential flaws. For starters, the report claims that iPhone users are more likely to have a graduate or doctoral degree than Android users, and the demographic differences can allegedly skew the results.

“Just collecting lots of information about people – who may or may not have a particular disease, and may or may not represent the typical patient – could just add noise and distraction,” said Lisa Schwartz, professor at the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, in an e-mail. “Bias times a million is still bias.”

Meanwhile, an iPhone user simply hitting a button by accident or giving his smartphone to someone else can also result in misleading data. Nevertheless, there are issues with data collected through traditional clinical trials as well, and ResearchKit allowing people to engage in medical research more easily is still valuable and, as Apple claims, could transform the way that medicine is approached forever.




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ResearchKit Receives Thousands of Sign-Ups Following Launch

Tim Cook Helps Kick Off iPhone 6 Sales at Palo Alto Retail Store

With Apple’s retail stores beginning sales of the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus today, customers have been lining up to either pick up their pre-ordered devices or take their chances on launch-day supplies without reservations. Piper Jaffray analyst Gene Munster conducted his annual line count at Apple’s flagship Fifth Avenue store in Manhattan and found a record 1,880 people in line at 8:00 AM, an increase of 33% over last year’s line.

Tim Cook at final employee meeting before opening doors of Palo Alto store (via @CNBCnow)
Apple executives are also getting into the spirit of the iPhone launch, with CEO Tim Cook making his traditional visit to the Palo Alto store to greet customers. Cook walked the line and posed for photos with customers before heading into the store to meet with staff and open the door to welcome customers.

Several other executives are also out and about, with new retail chief Angela Ahrendts presiding over her first iPhone launch by visiting the flagship store in Sydney, Australia, and Internet software and services chief Eddy Cue making an appearance at the Stanford store.

Nearly all Apple retail stores in launch countries have now opened for business today, with only the three stores in Honolulu, Hawaii yet to begin sales of the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus.




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Tim Cook Helps Kick Off iPhone 6 Sales at Palo Alto Retail Store

HealthKit is already helping top hospitals fight cancer, diabetes

; iOS 8′s HealthKit is already starting to change the way health researchers track patients’ wellness even though it hasn’t been released, as two of the country’s top research hospitals have launched HealthKit trials to track diabetics and patients with cancer and chronic…Read more ›



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HealthKit is already helping top hospitals fight cancer, diabetes

Apple’s Secretive Internal Training Program Detailed in New Profile

A new profile of Apple’s internal training program published by the New York Times has shed new light on how the company teaches its vision and practices to select new employees. Originally established by Steve Jobs and Apple’s Vice President of Human Resources Joel Podolny, the-so called „Apple University“ is a year-round, in-house program that allows employees to enroll in a number of classes with instructors coming from universities like Yale, Harvard, Stanford, M.I.T., and more.

Apple’s internal training programs are taught at the company’s Cupertino, California campus, with rooms being described as being „well lit“ and formed in a trapezoid shape with elevated seats so employees can clearly see their instructors.

Interested individuals sign up on an internal Apple website, as classes are taught to employees based on their positions at the company and work backgrounds. Some courses teach employees about vital business decisions in the history of Apple, with one employee citing a case study on how Steve Jobs chose to make the iPod and iTunes compatible with Windows after being opposed to the idea. Even classes for founders of recently acquired companies are available:

One class taught founders of recently acquired companies how to smoothly blend resources and talents into Apple. The company may also offer a course tailored specifically to employees of Beats, perhaps including its founders, Dr. Dre and Jimmy Iovine. Neither Apple nor Beats would comment.

Another course, titled „Communicating at Apple“, focuses on being able to convey products and ideas to others and is taught by the former Dean of Pixar University Randy Nelson among others. A detailed overview of the course given by an employee shares how Apple used the works of Picasso to explain its vision:

In a version of the class taught last year, Mr. Nelson showed a slide of „The Bull,“ a series of 11 lithographs of a bull that Picasso created over about a month, starting in late 1945. In the early stages, the bull has a snout, shoulder shanks and hooves, but over the iterations, those details vanish. The last image is a curvy stick figure that is still unmistakably a bull.

„You go through more iterations until you can simply deliver your message in a very concise way, and that is true to the Apple brand and everything we do,“ recalled one person who took the course.

Another class taught by Nelson, titled „What Makes Apple, Apple“ gives lessons on how the company executes its design principles with precision and simplicity in time. To convey that idea to employees, Nelson showed a comparison of the Apple TV remote that has three buttons and the remote from a Google TV, which features 68 buttons. The instructor explained that Apple designers included just what was needed, while the Google TV remote resulted in a complicated device because its designers „got everything that they wanted.“

Finally, the article describes a course called „The Best Things“, which teaches employees to be proactive in a high-caliber work environment so they can perform their best work. An example relayed to employees by course teacher and Stanford professor Joshua Cohen pointed out New York City’s Central Park, which was transformed from a rocky swamp into an area that made residents feel comfortable with nature. The goal of the class was to teach employees how to make intricate computer technologies feel natural, which was a main philosophy of Jobs.




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Apple’s Secretive Internal Training Program Detailed in New Profile