Adonit Announces New ‘Switch’ and ‘Mark’ Styluses

Adonit, a company that makes a range of popular styluses for iOS devices, today announced the launch of two new products – the Adonit Mark and the Adonit Switch. The Adonit Mark is an entry-level stylus that’s priced affordably while the Adonit Switch offers a more premium experience.

Adonit’s Mark is a standard mesh-tipped stylus with a few features to set it apart from competitors, including an anti-roll design and an aluminum body in either silver or black to match Apple’s Silver and Space Gray iOS devices.

The Adonit Switch is a convertible stylus that bundles a ballpoint pen with one of Adonit’s signature clear plastic precision stylus tips. One end contains a standard 0.8mm ballpoint pen tip, while the other works with all of Apple’s iOS devices. Like the Mark, it comes in silver and black.

Both the Switch and the Mark are available from the Adonit website. The Mark is priced at $12.99 and the Switch is priced at $39.99.

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Adonit Announces New ‘Switch’ and ‘Mark’ Styluses

Apple’s 4-Inch iPhone to Be Called ‘iPhone 5se’ With Design Modeled After iPhone 5s

Rumors suggesting Apple is working on an updated 4-inch iPhone have been circulating since the launch of the iPhone 6, but information that’s leaked out about the device has varied quite a bit between news sources. While some rumors pointed towards a 4-inch iPhone equivalent in power to the iPhone 6s, others suggested it would be a lower-end device modeled after the iPhone 5s.

New information shared by 9to5Mac and Chinese website MyDrivers [Google Translate] adds to the growing body of evidence pointing towards an iPhone 5s-style device that’s a step down from the iPhone 6s, potentially set to be called the „iPhone 5se“ to denote its position as an upgraded version of the iPhone 5s.

With the iPhone 5se, Apple may be aiming to introduce a device that’s going to deliver up-to-date features to customers who prefer smaller devices while still refraining from competing with its flagship 4.7 and 5.5-inch iPhones.

The 4-inch iPhone in development is rumored to look like an iPhone 5s

Recent rumors have suggested the 4-inch iPhone will have a body that’s similar enough to the iPhone 5s that the two devices will be able to share cases and other accessories, but there will be some design differences. The shiny edges that were featured on the iPhone 5s will be replaced with a curved cover glass like the iPhone 6 and 6s.

The iPhone 5se is expected to incorporate the same 8-megapixel rear camera and 1.2-megapixel front camera used in the iPhone 6, along with an improved autofocusing ability, support for larger panoramas, and the ability to capture Live Photos (but no 3D Touch). As has been rumored, it will include an NFC chip to enable Apple Pay, and features like Bluetooth 4.2, VoLTE, and 802.11ac WiFi. It may be available in Silver, Space Gray, Gold, and Rose Gold, or just three of those colors. Rumors are unclear.

According to 9to5Mac, the iPhone 5se will use the same A8 and M8 chips that are in the iPhone 6, while the report from MyDrivers suggests it could come with an A9 chip. Rumors about Apple’s 4-inch iPhone have consistently disagreed on the chip that it will use, split between the A8 and the A9.

MyDrivers supplies additional information on RAM, pricing, and battery life. In a somewhat questionable claim, the site says that Apple is sourcing 1GB and 1.2GB RAM from two suppliers. Previous rumors have said the 4-inch iPhone will include 1GB RAM.

The iPhone 5se may include a 1,624 mAh battery, which would last longer than the battery in the iPhone 5s, and according to MyDrivers, it may only be available in 16 and 64GB capacities at prices that start at 3688 Yuan or $560.

Mass production on the 4-inch screen for iPhone 5se is said to have kicked off this week, and while iPhone 6c/5se rumors have disagreed on many prospective features, all rumors have pointed towards an early 2016 release date. Apple is said to be planning a March event to unveil new products, and it’s possible that could be where Apple is planning to debut its 4-inch iPhone.

Related Roundups: iPhone 5se (2016), iPhone 6c
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Apple’s 4-Inch iPhone to Be Called ‘iPhone 5se’ With Design Modeled After iPhone 5s

Logitech Create Review: Excellent Keyboard, but Makes iPad Pro Bulky and Heavy

Logitech’s Create Keyboard Case for the iPad Pro was one of the first third-party keyboards available for the device, because Logitech created it with help from Apple. Because Logitech partnered with Apple for the accessory, it’s also the only third-party keyboard that’s currently able to take advantage of the Smart Connector on the iPad Pro, meaning it doesn’t need to connect to the iPad over Bluetooth or use its own power source.

We went hands-on with Logitech’s Create Keyboard case to see how it measures up to Apple’s own hard-to-find Smart Keyboard and the few other iPad Pro third-party keyboards on the market.

Design

Logitech designed the Create to transform the iPad Pro into a laptop clone, producing a keyboard that is close in design and feel to a traditional laptop keyboard. The case itself is made from a rigid material covered with a ballistic nylon fabric, while the keyboard is constructed from aluminum with plastic keys. Design wise, the Create is available in three colors – black, navy, and red – to match the Space Gray, Silver, and Gold iPads.

You can mix and match colors, but based on marketing materials, the black model is meant to match the Space Gray iPad, the navy model is meant for the Silver iPad, and the red version is designed to match the Gold iPad. Each model’s outer cover is designed to be resistant to liquid, keeping the iPad Pro safe from small spills, drips, and light rain.

The Create Keyboard has two main parts: the keyboard portion of the case and a rigid backplate that fits over the iPad Pro. The shell of the case fits over the top half of the iPad Pro in landscape mode, aligning with the camera. There’s a crease in the middle of the backplate that allows it to flex to fit the iPad Pro into the Smart Connector built into the case.

Only half of the iPad Pro is fitted securely in the case because of the need for that connection, and on multiple occasions, my iPad Pro popped out of the shell. This never happened in an area where I could potentially drop the iPad Pro, but it was a definite concern of mine. Having the iPad Pro pop out of the case at the wrong time could be a potential disaster, but at the same time, the bottom of the iPad Pro has to be free to fit properly.

Even though the iPad Pro is only in the case halfway and can pop out if not seated properly, it is difficult to get it out of the case. When snapped in all the way, it takes some grip and twisting to get it out, which is a downside if you want to use the iPad Pro sans keyboard. I know it sounds odd to say the iPad Pro is difficult to get out of the case just after complaining that it has the potential to snap out, but that’s how it works – it needs to be seated in the exact right way or you’re going to have trouble with the alignment of the cutouts and the volume buttons.

The Create Keyboard case leaves all ports accessible, with cutouts for the Lightning port and the rear camera. There are protruding buttons over the volume and sleep/wake controls, both of which are easy to press to control volume or turn the tablet on or off. The case also has sleep/wake functionality built in, so the iPad will go to sleep or wake up as the case is closed or opened.

When using the keyboard, the iPad Pro is angled forward in the case and snaps magnetically to a slot above the keyboard where the Smart Connector is housed. It has a single angle that’s usable while typing and it only works in landscape mode. A lot of third-party keyboards for other iPads like the iPad Air 2 have multiple viewing angles and support both orientations, but „Smart“ accessories for the iPad Pro are going to be more limited because of that physical connection between the keyboard and the tablet.

When the keyboard is not in use, it can be folded underneath the iPad Pro for watching videos or using the web, and it serves as complete protection for the tablet during travel. It closes up clamshell style, with the rear shell protecting the back of the iPad Pro and the keyboard protecting its screen.

Compared to Apple’s Smart Cover, which is thin and light, the Logitech Create Keyboard is undeniably bulky. It weighs in at 1.5 pounds, doubling the weight of the iPad Pro, which also weighs 1.5 pounds. At more than three pounds in total, that’s heavier than the 11 and 13-inch MacBook Air and the 12-inch Retina MacBook.

It’s also adding quite a bit of thickness to the iPad Pro, so while the keyboard does turn the iPad Pro into a much more capable MacBook-style machine, it’s adding some serious weight and bulk, which will be a turnoff for some potential buyers.

Smart Connector

The Logitech Create is the only third-party keyboard that’s currently able to take advantage of the Smart Connector on the iPad Pro. By connecting to the iPad Pro through the Smart Connector, the keyboard draws its power from the iPad. It never needs to be charged and because it’s connecting directly to the iPad Pro, there’s no need for Bluetooth.

This means there’s zero setup involved – simply stick the iPad Pro in the case and it works right away. There’s never any loss of connection unless the iPad Pro becomes unseated from the case, and there’s zero lag. Overall, the Smart Connector is a slight improvement over Bluetooth solutions, both in its simplicity and its convenience. Bluetooth is generally lag free with few connection problems and it’s rare to need to charge a third-party keyboard more than once a month, but the Smart Connector eliminates these small pain points.

The only downside to the Smart Connector is that it’s a little finicky at times. If you’ve got the Logitech Create on a lap and shift the wrong way, it can momentarily disconnect and interrupt what you’re doing.

Keys

Logitech’s Create keyboard case is inferior to Apple’s own Smart Keyboard when it comes to size and bulk, but for many users, its keyboard is a clear winner over the Smart Keyboard. The Logitech Create has full-spaced keys that feel fantastic under the fingers due to their high travel, especially in comparison to the Smart Keyboard.

Apple’s kept the Smart Keyboard thin by cutting down on the travel of the keys, so it’s not going to feel as familiar as the Logitech Create to people who are coming from a MacBook Air or a Retina MacBook Pro. If you have a MacBook, the Smart Keyboard keys and the MacBook keys feel similar.

Transitioning from a Retina MacBook Pro to the Logitech Create was seamless for me. I was able to start typing on the Create right away with zero typos and no reduction in my typing speed. The same isn’t true of the Smart Keyboard – it’s a definite adjustment for me. As someone who prefers the feel of a keyboard with a good amount of travel, I thought the Logitech Create was a far superior typing experience.

As with most third-party keyboards, the Logitech Create has a row of keys dedicated to iOS shortcuts on the iPad Pro. There’s a button for bringing up the home screen, accessing search, locking the iPad, switching keyboards (aka accessing emoji or special characters), controlling volume, adjusting screen brightness, controlling media playback, and adjusting the backlighting of the keys.

A major benefit of the Logitech Create over the Smart Keyboard is the backlighting. The Logitech Create has an auto backlighting feature built in that works really well. The keys will light up as soon as the keyboard is plugged in and they’ll brighten whenever they’re pressed. To save power, if you go a few seconds without touching a key, the backlighting automatically turns off. It’s done well and useful if you’re typing in a room without a lot of light, and it’s also adjustable to three levels on the keyboard itself.

Bottom Line

Both the Logitech Create keyboard and Apple’s own Smart Keyboard have appealing features and drawbacks. The Logitech Create keyboard is much heavier and bulkier than the Apple Smart Keyboard, but it’s also cheaper and has traditional MacBook Pro-style keys with a good amount of travel and a fantastic backlighting feature.

Choosing between the Logitech Create and the Smart Keyboard is going to come down to whether you prefer a more functional keyboard that feels like a MacBook Pro/Air keyboard or if you want portability and light weight. It’s not hard to adjust to the Smart Keyboard, but for a lot of users, it’s not going to provide the pleasant typing experience as the Logitech Create offers.

Along with better keys, you’re also getting more protection with the Logitech Create. The iPad Pro seems fragile because it’s so large – there’s a lot of surface there to break if its dropped or banged against something. The Logitech Create offers full front and back protection while the Smart Keyboard is only going to protect the screen.

In the future, there may be additional keyboard options on the market, but at the current time, there are few iPad Pro-specific products and only two that use the Smart Connector: the Logitech Create or the Smart Keyboard. Right now, it’s a matter of deciding between a lot of bulk or keys that don’t quite measure up if you want something that takes advantage of the newest technology.

As someone who owns and uses an iPad Pro on a daily basis, I would not choose the Logitech Create over the Smart Keyboard. It is too bulky and heavy and I am not a fan of the awkward and hard to use rear shell design. When it comes down to it, my fingers can adjust to keys with less travel better than my back can adjust to an additional 1.5 pounds of weight.

Of course, if you’re on a budget, there’s no need to go with either of these options. The iPad Pro still works with Bluetooth, so a standalone Bluetooth keyboard with an iPad Pro Smart Cover is going to be a perfectly useable option.

Pros:

Excellent keys

Smart Connector

Backlighting

Shortcut keys

Cons:

iPad Pro fit can be unstable

Rear shell design makes proper alignment difficult

Bulky

Heavy

Limited viewing angles

How to Buy

The Logitech Create iPad Pro Keyboard Case can be purchased from Apple.com or Apple retail stores for $149.99. It’s also available directly from the Logitech website and from Amazon.com.

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Logitech Create Review: Excellent Keyboard, but Makes iPad Pro Bulky and Heavy

Remarkable Deal: Colette Offering 50% Off Many Apple Watch Models

French boutique retailer Colette has launched an online sale offering many stainless steel Apple Watch and 18-karat gold Apple Watch Edition models for around 50% off, by far the lowest prices available for those Apple Watch models this Black Friday and Cyber Monday. Due to the significant savings, stock will likely be depleted very quickly.

A total of thirteen Apple Watch and six Apple Watch Edition models have been listed for half price, although some models appear to have already sold out. Colette is also selling individual stainless steel Link Bracelets and Milanese Loops for half price during the limited time promotion.

The list below compares Apple’s regular price to Colette’s sale price for each Apple Watch model. All prices are listed in U.S. dollars.

Apple Watch — SOLD OUT

– 38mm Stainless Steel Case with White Sport Band – $549 → $286.78

– 42mm Stainless Steel Case with White Sport Band – $599 → $308.87

– 38mm Stainless Steel Case with (PRODUCT)RED Sport Band – $549 → $286.78

– 42mm Stainless Steel Case with (PRODUCT)RED Sport Band – $599 → $308.87

– 42mm Stainless Steel Case with Black Sport Band – $599 → $308.87

– 38mm Space Black Stainless Steel Case with Black Sport Band – $549 → $286.78

– 38mm Stainless Steel Case with Black Classic Buckle – $649 → $330.96

– 42mm Stainless Steel Case with Black Classic Buckle – $699 → $353.06

– 38mm Stainless Steel Case with Milanese Loop – $649 → $330.96

– 38mm Stainless Steel Case with Link Bracelet – $949 → $485.62

– 42mm Stainless Steel Case with Link Bracelet – $999 → $507.71

– 38mm Space Black w/ Space Black Stainless Steel Link Bracelet – $1,049 → $529.80

– 42mm Space Black w/ Space Black Stainless Steel Link Bracelet – $1,099 → $551.91

Apple Watch Edition

– 38mm 18-Carat Rose Gold Case with White Sport Band – $10,000 → $4,860.62

– 38mm 18-Carat Yellow Gold Case w/ Bright Red Modern Buckle – $17,000 → $7,953.75

– 42mm 18-Carat Yellow Gold Case with Black Classic Buckle – $15,000 → $7,070

– 38mm 18-Carat Yellow Gold Case with Black Sport Band – $10,000 → $4,860.62

– 42mm 18-Carat Yellow Gold Case with Black Sport Band – $12,000 → $5,744.38

– 42mm 18-Carat Rose Gold Case with White Sport Band – $12,000 → $5,744.38

Colette offers online checkout for in-stock Apple Watch models and accessories, with American Express, MasterCard, Visa and PayPal listed as accepted payment methods. Each Apple Watch may only be purchased once.

Best Buy and Target are also offering Apple Watch deals for select models on Black Friday, including the Apple Watch Sport, which is not on sale through Colette. Deals may vary depending on time, location and product availability.

Update: As expected, Colette has sold out of stainless steel Apple Watch models, while Apple Watch Edition models remain available for purchase.

Related Roundups: Apple Watch, watchOS 2, Black Friday
Tags: Apple Watch Edition, Colette
Buyer’s Guide: Apple Watch (Neutral)
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Remarkable Deal: Colette Offering 50% Off Many Apple Watch Models

The Best Black Friday Deals on Macs, iPads, iPhones, Apple Watch, and More

With the Thanksgiving holiday well underway in the United States, Black Friday deals at both online and brick and mortar stores are starting to go live. Many major retail stores like Target, Best Buy, and Walmart will be opening up in the early evening, and most online-only deals are already live.

We’ve rounded up a few of the absolute best deals that can be had on products like the iPad, iPhone, MacBook, iMac, and Apple Watch below, and even more deals can be found in our full Black Friday roundup, which has a long list of retailers that are offering discounts.

Apple Watch

Both Target and Best Buy are offering Apple Watch deals. At Best Buy, the Apple Watch is up to $100 off, with a $50 discount for Apple Watch Sport models and a $100 discount for stainless steel Apple Watch models.

Target is offering a $100 Target gift card with the full price purchase of any Apple Watch or Apple Watch Sport.

iPhone

With the purchase of an iPhone 6s or 6s Plus on a device installment payment plan from Verizon, Sprint, or AT&T, Target is offering customers a $250 Target gift card.

With the purchase of an iPhone 5s, 6, 6 Plus, 6s, or 6s Plus using AT&T Next or a Verizon device payment plan, Walmart is offering $200 off in the form of a $100 bill credit and a $100 Walmart gift card.

iPad Air 2

There are a lot of deals available on the iPad Air 2, with discounts as high as $150 off.

Sam’s Club is discounting its entire stock of iPad Air 2 models by $150, dropping the price of the entry-level Wi-Fi only iPad Air 2 to $349.

Staples is selling the 64GB Wi-Fi only iPad Air 2 at a $150 discount, dropping the price to $449. The 16GB Wi-Fi only model is available at a $125 discount, dropping the price to $374.

Best Buy is selling the 16 and 64GB Wi-Fi only iPad Air 2 at a $100 discount, dropping the price to $399 and $499, respectively. The 128GB Wi-Fi only model is available at a $125 discount, dropping the price to $574.

For those who would prefer a gift card to a straight cash deal, Target is offering a $150 Target gift card with the purchase of any iPad Air 2 model.

iPad mini 4

Best Buy is selling the 64 and 128GB Wi-Fi only iPad mini 4 at a discount of $100, dropping the price to $399 and $499, respectively.

Staples is selling the 16GB Wi-Fi only iPad mini 4 for $299, a $100 discount off the regular price of $399.

For those who would prefer a gift card to a straight cash deal, Target is offering a $100 Target gift card with the purchase of any iPad mini 4 model.

12-inch MacBook

While Adorama and MacMall are offering $100 discounts on the 12-inch Retina MacBook, Best Buy and B&H Photos deals are the best, dropping prices by as much as $200.

1.1GHz/8GB/256GB Gold – $1,179, $120 off

1.1GHz/8GB/256GB Silver – $1,149, $150 off

1.1GHz/8GB/256GB Space Gray – $1,179, $120 off

1.2GHz/8GB/512GB Gold – $1,429, $170 off

1.2GHz/8GB/512GB Silver – $1,429, $170 off

1.2GHz/8GB/512GB Space Gray – $1,399, $200 off

MacBook Air

Best Buy and B&H Photo have the best prices on stock MacBook Air models. For non-stock models, MacMall is offering $81 off to $100 off.

11-inch 1.6GHz/4GB/128GB – $774, $125 off

11-inch 1.6GHz/4GB/256GB – $979, $120 off

13-inch 1.6GHz/4GB/128GB – $879, $120 off

13-inch 1.6GHz/4GB256GB – $1,079, $120 off

MacBook Pro

B&H Photo, MacMall, and Best Buy all have deals on Macs, with the lowest prices on stock configurations listed below. MacMall has discounts on a wide range of non-stock models, with $150 to $250 off.

13-inch 2.7GHz/8GB/128GB – $1,179, $150 off

– 13-inch 2.7GHz/8GB/256GB (Best Buy) (B&H Photo) (MacMall) – $1,349.99, $150 off

13-inch 2.9GHz/8GB/512GB – $1,599, $200 off

15-inch 2.2GHz/16GB/256GB – $1,699, $300 off

15-inch 2.5GHz/16GB/512GB – $2,149, $350 off

iMac

On stock iMac models, Best Buy, B&H Photo, and MacMall have some of the best deals available. For non-stock configurations, MacMall is offering discounts between $101 and $201.

21.5-inch 1.6GHz/8GB/1TB – $899, $200 off

– 21.5-inch 2.8GHz/8GB/1TB (B&H Photo) (MacMall) – $1,179, $120 off

21.5-inch 4K 3.1GHz/8GB/1TB – $1,299, $200 off

27-inch 5K 3.2GHz/8GB/1TB – $1,599, $200 off

– 27-inch 5K 3.2GHz/8GB/1TB Fusion (B&H Photo) (MacMall) – $1,799, $200 off

27-inch 5K/3.3GHz/2TB Fusion – $2,029, $250 off

Apple TV

As a doorbuster deal, Target is offering 25 percent off all Apple TVs. Supplies for this deal are likely to be limited.

Accessories

iPods – $50 off

Beats by Dre Powerbeats – $99.99, $100 off

Pebble Time – $129.99, $70 off

Fitbit Charge HR – $119 $30 off

Beats Solo 2 headphones – $97, $103 off

Software

Fantastical for iPhone – $2.99, 40 percent off

Fantastical for iPad – $4.99, 50 percent off

VMware Fusion Pro – $119 to purchase/$71.99 to upgrade, 40 percent off

VMware Fusion 8 – $55.99 to buy/$34.99 to upgrade, 30 percent off

VMware upgrades from Parallels – 55 percent off

VMware Fusion Pro and Workstation Pro bundle – $224.98, 50 percent off

Adobe Premiere Elements 14 – $59.99, 39 percent off

Adobe Photoshop Elements 14 – $59.99, 39 percent off

Microsoft Office 2016 for Mac – $99, $34 off

Pixelmator for Mac – $14.99, 50 percent off

Pixelmator for iPhone – $1.99, 50 percent off

Parallels – $79. Comes with 7 free apps, including 1Password and Evernote Premium

Make sure to check out the Black Friday roundup for specific times on when retail stores will open and more information on each of the deals listed above.

MacRumors is an affiliate partner with some of these vendors.

Related Roundup: Black Friday
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Satechi Review: Type-C USB Hub is Hit-or-Miss, Smaller Adapter is Reliable

When Apple launched the new 12-inch MacBook earlier this year, some of the first accessories for the laptop – which uses USB Type-C exclusively – were various adapters and dongles that allowed customers to expand the initially limiting capabilities of the hardware with access to traditional USB, HDMI, and SD card ports. Apple itself launched a line of expansion cables for USB Type-C devices, and now third-party accessory company Satechi has its own Type-C line of USB hubs and adapters for customers to choose from.

Satechi’s Type-C USB 3.0 3-in-1 Combo Hub

Satechi sent me two of the company’s new accessories focusing on the connectivity between USB-C devices and more traditional inputs, mainly USB 3.0. One of the accessories is a complex „Hub“ ($39.99, on sale for $34.99) with three USB 3.0 ports along with one SD and one microSD card slot, while the other is a simple dongle ($14.99) with a USB-C connector and a traditional USB-A 3.0 port. Each product comes in three different colors to match the shades of the new line of Retina MacBooks: Gunmetal (Space Gray), Gold, and Silver. Because neither dongle offers an additional USB-C port, there’s no passthrough charging feature.

Satechi’s Type-C USB Adapter

Overall, Satechi successfully mirrors Apple’s visual aesthetic with the two accessories, and although I was sent Gold accessories that didn’t exactly mesh well with my Space Gray MacBook, it seems when color-matched the new USB hubs would blend right in with their respective MacBooks.

With its most basic functions, the Satechi 3-in-1 Combo Hub provides simple USB-to-USB-C data transfer with little hassle. Once the Hub is plugged into a MacBook, a small light on the top of the accessory illuminates to confirm its activation, and users can then plug any USB 3.0 device into the accessory for access on the Retina MacBook. The Satechi Hub does accept SD cards and microSD cards but I had none on hand to test so can’t confirm their functionality first-hand.

I’d say it’s safe to assume the SD cards work as well as the USB ports on the Hub, but I ran into some noticeable issues with the accessory that may cause potential users cause for concern. First, Satechi’s accessory is oddly choosy on which USB devices it accepts to work through the Hub. With three separate USB sticks and an Apple-branded USB SuperDrive to test out, I discovered that one USB stick and the Apple SuperDrive simply didn’t work with the Hub.

When plugged into a separate computer both functioned normally, but plugged into the MacBook through the Satechi Hub, the USB drive never appeared on the MacBook. In a similar vein, the Apple USB SuperDrive repeatedly displayed caution messages reiterating the need for a separate power source to use the device, suggesting the Hub is limited in the amount of bus power it can provide. Essentially the only USB-related product I occasionally dust off is the SuperDrive, so it’s particularly disappointing that Satechi’s 3-in-1 Hub doesn’t work with it. The Hub also tends to heat up with extended use, but it didn’t appear to affect performance in my testing.

Second, the slender dongle raises some issues in its design: when plugged into the MacBook, the only anchor tethering it to the computer is the small USB-C connector. The Hub itself is just over 3.25 inches long and because of the MacBook’s design has no extra support down the length of its side on the opposite end of the USB-C adapter. Although any harm is unlikely if handled with care, it certainly feels like there is potential for damage to either the Hub or the MacBook if the combination is held or picked up awkwardly and significant torque is applied to the connection.

Satechi’s cheaper, smaller counterpart for the Hub is arguably a better accessory for users who need only a simple 1-to-1 device. I tested it out with the same USB sticks and USB SuperDrive, and everything worked without hassle. Apple’s USB SuperDrive never gave a single error message as it did during my time with the Hub.

It’s a smaller device, far more easily susceptible to loss (similar to SanDisk’s Dual USB Drive), but at a low-entry price and economical functionality, it’s arguably a better investment. Its only real downfall is that due to its small footprint, any leverage needed to remove a USB stick from its port will nearly always require users to first remove the entire adapter from the MacBook.

Satechi’s 3-in-1 Hub is a bit more difficult to recommend. Although the two devices are meant for different people and purposes – the Hub aimed at someone needing more connectivity, the simple dongle at more of a casual user – there are just too many issues with the design and hit-or-miss execution of the Hub to recommend the $39.99 device even to those in need of its three USB ports.

On the other hand, the $14.99 Satechi dongle is one of the lowest cost USB to USB-C devices on the market, and functions as advertised. It also comes in about $5 under Apple’s $19.99 version of the accessory, which is a bit longer with a slender white cable connecting the USB-C end with a USB port. Anyone in need of basic USB-to-USB-C adaptability, and who wants to save a little extra money, would do well to look into Satechi’s simpler Type-C USB Adapter.

Both of Satechi’s accessories are available to purchase from the company’s official website, although a few of the Hubs (Gold and Gunmetal) are currently unavailable.

Related Roundup: Retina MacBook
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Buyer’s Guide: MacBook (Neutral)
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Satechi Review: Type-C USB Hub is Hit-or-Miss, Smaller Adapter is Reliable

At NeXT, Steve Jobs was “obsessed” with returning to Apple

In a recent interview, tech investor Steve Jurvetson said that, while in exile at NeXT, Steve Jobs remained obsessed about coming back to Apple. The interview was conducted by Bloomberg’s Emily Chang, who sat down with the venture capitalist and Space X and Tesla investor. The money quote about Jobs comes around the three minute […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)


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At NeXT, Steve Jobs was “obsessed” with returning to Apple

Transform your regular desk into a healthier standing one with this sturdy add-on

Lust List: Sit-Stand Desktop Workstation by Ergotron I’ve got a love/hate relationship with standing desks. While I love the health benefits of standing, I seriously cannot stand at my desk all day every day. It needs to be easily adjustable. Also, not all of us have the space for yet another desk in our homes […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)


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Transform your regular desk into a healthier standing one with this sturdy add-on