Leaked ‘iPhone 7’ Display Backlight Shows Moved 3D Touch and Flex Cables

Taiwanese website Apple.club.tw has shared leaked images of the purported backlight assembly for the „iPhone 7“ display. The component draws some similarities to the iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus backlight assembly, although the 3D Touch chip and LCD flex cables are relocated on this leaked part.

Leaked backlight assembly purportedly for „iPhone 7“ display

The website speculates the component could also be for Apple’s next-generation 4-inch iPhone, but previous reports have said the much-rumored „iPhone 6c“ will not have 3D Touch. The pictured size of the 3D Touch chip and flex cables also suggests the backlight assembly is designed for larger than a 4-inch display.

iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus backlight assembly for comparison

Apple.club.tw has accurately leaked or republished multiple Apple products in the past, including the iPhone 6 protruding camera lens, iPhone 6 logic board and iPad Air 2 logic board, but its February 2015 rumor about Apple adding Touch ID on the MacBook, Magic Mouse and Magic Trackpad has yet to happen.

Apple may remove the 3.5mm headphone jack on the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus in favor of an all-in-one Lightning connector, possibly helping the smartphones achieve between 6.0mm and 6.5mm thinness and a waterproof design. The devices may also have a faster TSMC-built A10 chip and non-metallic casing with hidden antenna bands.

iPhone 7 Plus could have 3GB of RAM, 256GB storage and a larger 3,100 mAh battery.

Related Roundup: iPhone 7
Tags: apple.club.tw, 3D Touch, backlight assembly
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Hate Apple’s new iPhone battery case? Don’t buy it

Yes, Apple launched a new battery case for iPhone 6s today, and yes, it’s butt-ugly. All battery cases are, but because this one has an Apple logo on it, the Internet is getting all bent out of shape over just how ugly it is. There’s one thing nobody is mentioning, though: You don’t have to buy […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)


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How to Customize Apple’s Magic Mouse

While the Magic Mouse has been around for quite some time, Apple recently updated the accessory with an integrated rechargeable battery and other changes, so some MacRumors readers deciding to give the device a try may be new to it. If you’re coming from a more traditional mouse, you should know there’s a lot the Magic Mouse can do that might not be obvious. Rather than merely serving as a point and click device, the Magic Mouse and Magic Mouse 2 use swiping and tapping gestures along with the traditional clicks.

Because the Magic Mouse incorporates taps and swipes, some of its features may be hidden or confusing to someone that’s never used one before. We’ve created this quick how-to guide for readers who are new to the Magic Mouse, covering the ins and outs of the device to help you get the most out of it.

First off, we want to note that tapping is not the same as clicking. The latter, as with traditional mouse buttons, requires that you press on the mouse until you hear a clicking noise or feel a clicking action.

Tapping is not a common feature on a traditional mouse, but is one of Apple’s Magic Mouse specialties. When you tap on the mouse lightly, as if you were tapping on your iPhone screen, you are triggering a different action than clicking.

The Magic Mouse supports tapping or double tapping with one finger and tapping or double tapping with two fingers, all of which trigger different actions, depending on what you have enabled.

The Magic Mouse also supports swiping gestures with one or two fingers. Swiping up or down with one finger triggers the scrolling function. When enabled, swiping left or right with one finger allows you to switch between pages that you’ve visited in Safari, and lets you swipe between full screen apps when using two fingers.

For those who have recently begun using a Magic Mouse for the first time, it is possible to „right-click.“ The feature isn’t missing. It’s just not enabled by default.

You can also reverse the direction of the scrolling action that your finger uses. If you are used to scrolling up to move the content on the screen up, you will want to enable natural scrolling.

To enable right-clicking and natural scrolling:

  1. Click on the Apple logo in the upper left corner of the screen and select System Preferences from the drop down menu.
  2. Click on Mouse.
  3. Select the Point & Click section.
  4. To enable natural scrolling, check the box next to „Scroll direction: natural.“
  5. To enable right clicking, select „Secondary click.“ Once enable, you can switch from right to left click if you prefer that option.

In this section, you can also enable Smart Zoom, which lets you zoom into compatible documents and apps by double tapping the mouse with one finger in compatible applications. For example, you can double tap to zoom in Safari and Chrome, but it does not work with Pages or Mail.

If you find that your pointer doesn’t seem to move as fast as you’d like, you can adjust the tracking speed in this section as well. This will make the pointer move across the screen faster or slower, depending on your preference.

To enable additional swiping and tapping features:

  1. Click on the Apple logo in the upper left corner of the screen and select System Preferences from the drop down menu.
  2. Click on Mouse.
  3. Select the More Gestures section.

You can enable the ability to swipe between web pages in Safari by checking the box next to „Swipe between pages.“ You can also choose to swipe left or right with one finger, two fingers, or both. If you want the option to swipe between full-screen apps, chose the one finger option.

When enabled, you can swipe between full screen apps. If you have multiple apps open in full screen, swipe with two fingers on the Magic Mouse to switch from one to another.

You can also enable the ability to quickly access Mission Control by double tapping the Magic Mouse with two fingers.

With the double-tap feature enabled, you can further execute Mission Control commands by double tapping a specific open app in the Dock. If a window is already displayed on your screen, double tap the app’s icon in the dock to select it in Mission Control. That window will appear on screen and you can click on it to bring it to the front of your working area.

Being a new Magic Mouse user, you may find that some of these swiping and tapping features accidentally get in the way of your computing experience. For example, you might accidentally tend to tap on the mouse, causing it to zoom in on a website when you didn’t want it to, or double tap on an app icon in the dock.

If these gestures cause you more harm than good, simply disable them by following the instructions above and unchecking the boxes for the gestures you no longer wish to use.

Incidentally, if you’re wondering how to tell how much charge your Magic Mouse (and keyboard and trackpad) have left, you can see the battery percentage by clicking on the Bluetooth icon on the Menu bar in the upper right corner of the screen. Then, click on the peripheral you wish to check to see the remaining battery percentage.

The Magic Mouse takes a bit of getting used to when you’ve been working with a more traditional mouse for most of your life, but once you get the hang of it, the added swiping and tapping features will likely become something you don’t want to live without.

Tag: Magic Mouse 2
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New Apple TV ads showcase apps and games

The new Apple TV is all about apps and games, so it makes sense that there are five new ads from Apple on its YouTube channel that are all about specific games and apps. Check out the videos below for streaming media apps like Netflix and HBO, along with a trio of gaming titles, including […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)


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Is Apple’s new 4K iMac a total ripoff?

Apple delivered the 4K iMac many fans have been waiting for this week, but it’s not quite the all-in-one powerhouse some were expecting. Look past its beautiful design and you’ll find a lot of drawbacks you probably wouldn’t (and shouldn’t) expect to get with a $1,500 computer. The upside is, this gives another great topic for […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)


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Take a peek inside Apple’s magical new peripherals

Apple’s magical new Mouse, TrackPad and keyboard have been given the official teardown treatment from the guys at iFixit today, revealing the minuscule components inside the rechargeable new peripherals. The teardown on the keyboard reveals the tiny new battery Apple squeezed in that has some design similarities to the iPhone’s battery. iFixit also took a […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)


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Video Review Roundup: Magic Mouse 2, Magic Keyboard and Magic Trackpad 2

Apple introduced a trio of new keyboard and mouse accessories in the Magic Mouse 2, Magic Keyboard and Magic Trackpad 2 this week, and the first hands-on unboxing videos of the new products are now available.

YouTube reviewer Michael Kukielka has uploaded an unboxing and video review of the Magic Mouse 2, $79, providing a closer look at the mouse’s new bottom-facing Lightning port for charging, minor design changes, what’s included in the box, Bluetooth and Lightning to USB pairing processes and more.

Magic Mouse 2 has improved tracking and moves across surfaces with less resistance, as the mouse’s weight was reduced from 3.9 ounces to 3.5 ounces, and because it has an optimized foot design and fewer moving parts.

Kukielka concludes that the Magic Mouse 2 looks and functions similarly to the original Magic Mouse, with the inclusion of a rechargeable lithium-ion battery that gains 9 hours of usage from a 2-minute fast charge, and lasts approximately one month on a full two-hour charge.

YouTube reviewer Dave Cryer shared an unboxing and mini review of the Magic Keyboard, $99, and Magic Trackpad 2, $129, in addition to a quick comparison with the existing Apple Wireless Keyboard and original Magic Trackpad.

The video provides a closer look at the Magic Keyboard’s slimmer wedge-like design, rear-facing Lightning port for charging, power on-off switch and slightly larger keys with a reengineered scissor mechanism. Cryer found typing to be more precise, but said the slightly shorter key travel will take getting used to.

Cryer also went hands-on with the Magic Trackpad 2, showing off its matching wedge-like side profile, rear-facing Lightning port for charging and power on-off switch. The new Magic Trackpad 2 features Force Touch and has a larger edge-to-edge glass design with 29% more surface area, which is noticeable in the side-by-side comparison.

The video also shows what’s in the Magic Keyboard and Magic Trackpad 2 boxes, including a Lightning to USB cable, quick start guide and regulatory information.



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How to turn off El Capitan’s ‘shake to find’ mouse cursor feature

When I lose track of my mouse cursor, I’ve always just wiggled it a bit to find it on the screen. It’s a natural gesture, and Apple’s capitalized on it with its new “shake to find” feature in El Capitan. If you’re constantly shaking your mouse or swiping quickly on your mousepad, maybe while gaming […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)


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Apple releases ‘stunning’ new 4K and 5K iMacs

Apple today revealed its refreshed line of iMacs, including a brand new 21.5-inch 4K Retina iMac and 27-inch 5K Retina model. The smaller iMac now matches the pixel density of the larger 5K iMac, giving it 4.5 times the resolution of Full HD. The 27-inch iMac, meanwhile, boasts Retina 5K displays across the board, whereas previously […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)


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