iOS 9.2 Tidbits: Top Stories for News, AT&T NumberSync, Mail Drop, USB Camera Adapter Support, and More

The second major update to iOS 9, iOS 9.2, was released this morning, with a long list of bug fixes and improvements to features and apps like Apple Music, News, Mail, Podcasts, Safari, iBooks, and more. There are quite a few outward-facing changes tweaks and changes to the operating system, and we’ve gathered up a list of the major new features below.

News – Apple’s News app has been updated with features that are designed to make it more attractive to users and publishers. As outlined by Re/code, News will now include lists of top stories curated by Apple editors and published a „couple of times a day.“ For publishers, Apple is also implementing integration with Comscore.

AT&T NumberSync – iOS 9.2 adds support for AT&T’s NumberSync service, which is an expansion of Wi-Fi calling. As outlined in Apple’s updated Wi-Fi calling support document, it is now possible for AT&T users to place Wi-Fi calls from their iPads, Apple Watches, and Macs (with OS X El Capitan) even when an iPhone is not nearby.

Continuity previously allowed a similar feature, but required an iPhone to be nearby as it used the phone’s cellular connection. Similar advanced Wi-Fi calling features are also available to T-Mobile and Sprint users.

Apple Music – There are a lot of small tweaks to Apple Music to remove various pain points. When adding a song to a playlist, for example, it’s now possible to create a new playlist instead of having to use an existing one, and playlists are ordered by most recent changes. There are also clearer indicators for which songs have been downloaded, and albums or playlists from iCloud Music Library can be downloaded by tapping the iCloud download button. The classical music catalog in Apple Music has been improved with works, composers, and performers.

Mail Drop – For the first time, Mail Drop can be used on iOS to send attachments up to 5GB in size. Mail Drop is a feature that was previously limited to the Mac version of the Mail app.

iBooks – iBooks includes support for 3D Touch, allowing users to peek and pop into pages from the table of contents, notes and bookmarks, or search results with force press gestures. iBooks also includes support for listening to an audiobook while browsing a library, reading other books, or viewing the iBooks Store.

USB Camera Adapter – With iOS 9.2, iPhones are now able to support Apple’s USB Camera Adapter and related accessories for importing pictures from a digital camera or DSLR. Previously, only iPads supported the USB Camera Adapter. The iPhone 5 and later appear to work with the USB Camera Adapter/iPad Camera Connection Kit. The iPhone 4s and the iPod touch do not support it.

Safari View Controller – The Safari View Controller, which is what allows a pop-up Safari window to be used within third-party apps, has been improved. In iOS 9.2, the Safari View Controller supports third-party Action Extensions, letting apps like 1Password be accessed in the Safari view of other apps like Tweetbot. There’s also a new ability to long tap on the Reload button to load content without content blockers, support for the request desktop site function, and an edge swipe feature for dismissing the Safari window within apps.

In the Hipchat app for iOS, clicking a link brings up an in-app browser. In iOS 9.1, seen on the left, there’s no option for third-party extensions. In iOS 9.2, seen on the right, there’s support for third-party extensions like 1Password.​

We’ll be updating this tidbits post should any new features in iOS 9.2 be discovered. Our dedicated iOS 9 forum is also a great place to get more details on the new update, as users are discussing all of the changes that have been discovered in iOS 9.2.

The new update is currently available to all users with an iPhone 4s or later and can be downloaded over-the-air by going to Settings –> General –> Software Update.

Related Roundup: iOS 9
Tag: iOS 9.2
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iOS 9.2 Tidbits: Top Stories for News, AT&T NumberSync, Mail Drop, USB Camera Adapter Support, and More

iOS 9.2 is now available to the public

Apple just released iOS 9.2 to the public today after months of beta testing by developers and public testers. iOS 9.2 is the second major update since iOS 9 was released to in Septmeber and brings with it a host of new bug fixes, as well as significant tweaks to the Safari View Controller that […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)


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iOS 9.2 is now available to the public

Apple starts raising iTunes Match limit to 100,000 tracks

Back in June, Apple’s Eddy Cue promised that iTunes Match – Apple’s song matching service that syncs local music files to the iCloud for streaming anytime – would soon phase out its 25,000 track limit in favor of 100,000 tracks. Sadly, we haven’t heard anything more about that since. But Apple might now be soft-launching […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)


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Apple starts raising iTunes Match limit to 100,000 tracks

How Apple out-innovates the competition, this week on The CultCast

Though Apple spends far less on research and development than the competition, they out-innovate them all. How? Catch the discussion on this episode of The CultCast. Plus: iPhone 7 may ditch the beloved headphone jack; Amazon Video is coming to Apple TV; the holiday accessory that could be eroding your WiFi signal; and with the […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)


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How Apple out-innovates the competition, this week on The CultCast

Apple’s Swift programming language goes open source

Swift, the fast growing computer programming language created by Apple, is officially going open source starting today. Apple unveiled Swift at WWDC in 2014 with a promise to make it open source in the future. Now that the language has become one of the fastest adopted languages in history, the company announced this morning that the […]

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Apple’s Swift programming language goes open source

Apple’s Swift Programming Language Now Open Source

As promised, Apple has officially made its Swift programming language open source, making the project available through Swift.org.

We are excited by this new chapter in the story of Swift. After Apple unveiled the Swift programming language, it quickly became one of the fastest growing languages in history. Swift makes it easy to write software that is incredibly fast and safe by design. Now that Swift is open source, you can help make the best general purpose programming language available everywhere.

Announced at WWDC 2014 and launched alongside iOS 8 and OS X Yosemite a few months later, Swift marks a significant step forward from the Objective-C previously favored by Apple.

On December 3, 2015, the Swift language, supporting libraries, debugger, and package manager were published under the Apache 2.0 license with a Runtime Library Exception, and Swift.org was created to host the project. The source code is hosted on GitHub where it is easy for anyone to get the code, build it themselves, and even create pull requests to contribute code back to the project. Everyone is welcome, even just to file a bug report. There are excellent Getting Started guides available here on the site as well.

The project is governed by a core team of engineers that drive the strategic direction by working with the community, and a collection of code owners responsible for the day-to-day project management. Technical leaders come from the community of contributors and anyone can earn the right to lead an area of Swift. The Community Guidelines includes detailed information on how the Swift community is managed.

With the open sourcing of Swift, Apple has also released a Linux port to expand access to the language. Apple has also begun sharing design guidelines related to the upcoming Swift 3, setting the stage for „a more cohesive feel to Swift development.“

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Apple’s Swift Programming Language Now Open Source

Apple Opens Cryptographic Libraries to Third-Party Developers to Encourage Security

Apple announced yesterday that the company has opened up its cryptographic libraries so that third-party developers can build more „advanced security features“ into their apps (via VentureBeat). The cryptographic libraries being opened to developers are the same ones Apple uses to protect iOS and OS X, as Apple notes on its updated site.

Developers will have access to two of the company’s advanced security features, including Security Framework and Common Crypto. Security Framework gives developers tools for organizing certificates, public and private keys, and trust policies, ensuring that all sensitive information is stored privately in a „secure repository for sensitive user data.“ Common Crypto library provides additional support for symmetric encryption, hash-based message authentication codes, and digests.

Both Security Framework and Common Crypto rely on the corecrypto library to provide implementations of low level cryptographic primitives. This is also the library submitted for validation of compliance with U.S. Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) 140-2 Level 1. Although corecrypto does not directly provide programming interfaces for developers and should not be used by iOS or OS X apps, the source code is available to allow for verification of its security characteristics and correct functioning.

Check out Apple’s official website for reference sheets, service guides, and links to the open source releases for Security Framework and Common Crypto libraries.
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Apple Opens Cryptographic Libraries to Third-Party Developers to Encourage Security

Apple Aiming to Increase Music Library Matching Limit to 100,000 Tracks ‘Before the End of the Year’

Just ahead of the launch of Apple Music in late June, Apple’s senior vice president of Internet Software and Services Eddy Cue took to Twitter to reveal that Apple was „working to“ increase the limit for iTunes Match libraries and Apple Music’s similar scan-and-match feature from the current 25,000 tracks to 100,000 tracks for iOS 9.

The arrival of iOS 9 last month did not come with a corresponding increase for the library matching limits, and users in our forums and elsewhere have been wondering when the increase will be rolled out or if there has been a change in plans.

In an effort to answer that question, MacRumors asked Cue for an update on the limit increase, and he tells us Apple is „definitely working on it“ and that he expects it will be released „before the end of the year.“

Apple’s $25/year iTunes Match service and Apple Music’s matching feature allow users to add their own songs that are not available from the iTunes Store catalog to the cloud, making them available on other devices using the same Apple ID. The services scan a user’s music library to determine which tracks are already available in the iTunes Store, automatically making those available in the user’s library. Only those tracks that are not matched to the iTunes Store catalog are then uploaded to the cloud, saving time and bandwidth.

The scan-and-match functionality has been limited to libraries of 25,000 tracks since iTunes Match debuted in 2011, although tracks purchased from the iTunes Store do not count toward this limit. Users with larger music libraries have had to use workarounds such as splitting their tracks into two iTunes libraries in order to take advantage of the matching services, but with the impending increase to a 100,000-track limit, many of these users will no longer need to resort to these workarounds.



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Apple Aiming to Increase Music Library Matching Limit to 100,000 Tracks ‘Before the End of the Year’