How to serve multiple search domains from Cisco IOS DHCP server?

Source – https://www.perkin.org.uk/

The expected

[code language=“plain“]ip dhcp pool host.net.example.com
option 119 ascii net.example.com,example.com[/code]

doesn’t work. So you need to encode search domains in hex using following example script written in Python:

[code language=“python“]#!/usr/bin/env python
import syshexlist = []for domain in sys.argv[1:]:
for part in domain.split(„.“):
hexlist.append(„%02x“ % len(part))
for c in part:
hexlist.append(c.encode(„hex“))
hexlist.append(„00“)print „“.join([(„.%s“ % (x) if i and not i % 2 else x) \
for i, x in enumerate(hexlist)])[/code]

Execute it:

[code language=“plain“]$ ./cisco.py net.example.com example.com
036e.6574.0765.7861.6d70.6c65.0363.6f6d.0007.6578.616d.706c.6503.636f.6d00[/code]

So the config in ios must look like:

[code language=“plain“]ip dhcp pool host.net.example.com
option 119 hex 036e.6574.0765.7861.6d70.6c65.0363.6f6d.0007.6578.616d.706c.6503.636f.6d00[/code]

It’s done!

Apple Will Fix ‘January 1, 1970’ Date Bug in Upcoming iOS Update

Apple has officially acknowledged the „1970“ date bug affecting 64-bit iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch devices. The support document does not identify a current fix, but Apple said that an upcoming iOS software update will prevent the issue from occurring in the future.

Manually changing the date to May 1970 or earlier can prevent your iOS device from turning on after a restart. An upcoming software update will prevent this issue from affecting iOS devices. If you have this issue, contact Apple Support.

Manually changing an iOS device’s date to January 1, 1970 results in a continuous reboot cycle, effectively bricking the device. Restoring through iTunes in DFU Mode also does not appear to work.

Apple has not provided a reason for the bug, but YouTube video maker and programmer Tom Scott speculates that setting the date close to January 1, 1970, which is 0 in Unix time, may be resulting in an integer underflow – in this case, a date prior to January 1, 1970.

iOS then handles the underflow by returning the negative integrer to the maximum value, which Scott says results in a date that is some 20 times longer than the universe is expected to last. Scott believes iOS may have difficulties handling this large number, resulting in affected devices crashing.

German website Apfelpage.de shared a second YouTube video showing that opening an iPhone and resetting its battery could fix the problem, but this method could damage your smartphone and void your warranty if done incorrectly. The safer option may be to visit a Genius Bar or contact Apple Support online or by phone.

iOS is a Unix-based operating system, and Unix time starts at 00:00:00 UTC on January 1, 1970. Apple does not allow you to manually set your iOS device to a date prior to then, likely in an effort to prevent a bug like this, but changing the date to May 1970 or earlier still causes issues on 64-bit devices.
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Apple Will Fix ‘January 1, 1970’ Date Bug in Upcoming iOS Update

Apple Open Sources Swift Benchmark Suite

Apple today announced that its Swift benchmark suite is open source, just over two months after making its Swift programming language open sourced as promised at the 2015 Worldwide Developers Conference.

Apple’s Swift benchmarking suite is designed to track Swift performance with 75 benchmarks that cover multiple important Swift workloads, libraries with commonly needed benchmarking functions, drivers for running benchmarks and displaying performance metrics, and a utility for comparing benchmark metrics across multiple versions of Swift. The Swift benchmark suite is available on GitHub.

Introduced in 2014 and launched alongside iOS 8 and OS X, Swift is Apple’s programming language built for iOS, OS X, watchOS, and tvOS, designed to work with Cocoa and Cocoa Touch frameworks along with Objective-C while also being widely accessible. In 2015, Apple debuted Swift 2 with new features like advanced error handling and syntax enhancements.
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Apple Open Sources Swift Benchmark Suite

Nearly One-Third of iPhone Users Still Have 4-Inch Screens

The latest data from Mixpanel shows that approximately 32.22% of active iPhone users still have a 4-inch screen. That is the same screen size as the so-called „iPhone 5se“ that Apple is expected to announce at its rumored March 15 event.

Apple has released three iPhone models with 4-inch screens since 2013, including the iPhone 5, iPhone 5c, and iPhone 5s, and some customers still feel these smartphones have the best screen size for pocketability and one-handed usage.

Apple’s newest 4-inch smartphone, the iPhone 5s, represented just under 20 percent of current iPhones in use, trailed by the iPhone 5 at 7.53 percent and the plastic-backed iPhone 5c at 5.66 percent. The numbers fluctuate slightly in real time.

In the company’s latest earnings call, Apple CEO Tim Cook said that 60 percent of older-generation iPhone users have yet to upgrade to the iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, iPhone 6s, or iPhone 6s Plus.

Right now, customers that want a 4-inch iPhone have to settle for the over two-year-old iPhone 5s’s outdated tech specs, and the smartphone also lacks many new features such as Apple Pay, 3D Touch, and Live Photos.

For that reason, the „iPhone 5se“ with a rumored 4-inch screen, Apple’s newest A9 chip, Live Photos, and purported price of around $500 may prove to be a more popular option among prospective iPhone buyers.
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Nearly One-Third of iPhone Users Still Have 4-Inch Screens

iOS Keyboard Maker SwiftKey Acquired by Microsoft for $250M

SwiftKey, the company behind the popular third-party SwiftKey Keyboard for iOS and Android devices, is being acquired by Microsoft, reports Financial Times. Microsoft is said to be purchasing SwiftKey for $250 million in a deal that will be announced imminently.

The SwiftKey keyboard has been available on Android devices since 2010, expanding to iOS in January of 2014 through the SwiftKey notes app. When Apple included support for third-party keyboards in iOS 8, SwiftKey was one of the first companies to produce a keyboard replacement app.

SwiftKey’s keyboard is notable for its word prediction tools, incorporating artificial intelligence and machine learning to make custom word predictions based on what a user has previously written. Microsoft will likely use SwiftKey’s technology to bolster its own AI-based products, including its Word Flow keyboard and virtual assistant Cortana.
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iOS Keyboard Maker SwiftKey Acquired by Microsoft for $250M

Nintendo promises “big characters” like Mario coming to smartphones this year

Last year, Nintendo said pit would deliver its first smartphone game by the end of 2015, and five other smartphone games by 2017. The first Nintendo game for smartphones, though, was delated until March, and worse, features none of Nintendo’s best known characters. What about the other games slated for 2016 then? Don’t fear: Nintendo’s […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)


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Nintendo promises “big characters” like Mario coming to smartphones this year

Swiss Manufacturer Creates High-End Mechanical Apple Watch Clone

Ahead of the Apple Watch’s launch, many high-end Swiss watch makers were critical of its design and Apple’s efforts to position it as a high-fashion item. TAG Heuer CEO Jean-Claude Biver went as far as to call it „too feminine,“ saying the Apple Watch looked like „it was designed by a student in their first trimester.“

As time has passed, opinions on the Apple Watch have changed. It has prompted some high-end luxury watch makers to consider delving into the smart watch market themselves, and it also seems to be the inspiration behind high-end watchmaker H. Moser & Cie.’s latest product.

Shared today by watch site Hodinkee, H. Moser & Cie.’s Swiss Alp Watch has a design that’s immediately familiar, featuring a rectangular watch face with curved, rounded edges, a crown at the side, and Apple Watch-style lugs for holding a band in place.

Constructed from solid 18-karat white gold, the Swiss Alp Watch measures in at 38.2mm by 44mm, with a depth of 10.3mm. That’s comparable to the 42mm Apple Watch, which is 35.9mm by 42mm with a depth of 10.5mm. It comes with a beige kudu leather strap with a white gold pin buckle.

The resemblance between the Swiss Alp Watch and the Apple Watch is purely physical. There is no processor, no OLED display, and no sensors in the Swiss Alp Watch, which is entirely mechanical. When flipped over, there’s no heart rate sensor – instead, the inner mechanics of the watch (a finished tonneau movement with a Straumann hairspring, according to Hodinkee) are visible through a clear sapphire crystal panel.

H. Moser & Cie. does not mention the Apple Watch on its website or in its marketing materials, but when speaking to Hodinkee, H. Moser & Cie. CEO Edouard Meylan said the Swiss Alp Watch is symbolic, serving as a proof traditional mechanical watchmaking has a future in a world where the digital smart watch is becoming commonplace. Swiss watchmaking, he says, has weathered other challenges and it will continue on.

„Today, H. Moser & Cie. launches the Swiss Alp Watch as a statement of this new challenge and to prove that traditional mechanical watchmaking has a future, and it is, in fact, the future. It is much more than a watch for us. The Swiss Alp Watch is symbolic. It represents our resilience, our ferocious desire to fight for our values and traditions. It embodies everything we believe in.“

Given that H. Moser & Cie. is pricing the white gold Swiss Alp Watch at $24,900 with only 50 pieces available, it’s unlikely Apple will take offense over the copycat design.

The full story of the H. Moser & Cie. Swiss Alp Watch, which includes background color on the Swiss watch industry and hands-on details, can be read over at Hodkinee.
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Swiss Manufacturer Creates High-End Mechanical Apple Watch Clone

Apple Refreshes ‘Start Something New’ Campaign Worldwide

Apple has reintroduced its „Start Something New“ campaign ahead of New Year’s Day in the U.S., Australia, Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, New Zealand, Philippines, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, U.K., Vietnam and several other countries worldwide.

„Start Something New“ features a gallery of nearly a dozen paintings, photos, drawings, short films and other pieces of creative work made by artists using Apple products and apps, ranging from the Apple Pencil, iMac and iPad Air 2 to Adobe After Effects, Darkroom and Procreate.

Apple has also shared individual profiles for each new work and artist on its website:

Painting fluid landscapes by Lu Jun, China

Painting with dots by Lieu Nguyen, Vietnam

Chasing wild vistas by Emma Phillips, Australia

Illustrating nature through its details by Tiffany Bozic, USA

Drawing with light by Darren Pearson, USA

Shooting from a new perspective by Bernhard Lang, Germany

Visualizing the power of gravity by Greg Barth, UK

Cultivating a different kind of rose by Kahori Maki, Japan

Composing a sense of wonder by Jake Sargeant, USA

Seeking color in the streets by Brian Lotti, USA

Capturing the texture of movement by William Hundley, USA

Apple ran a nearly identical campaign in December 2014, starting in Japan and later expanding to the U.S. and other countries.
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Apple Refreshes ‘Start Something New’ Campaign Worldwide

New iPhone app Yallo lets you record your conversations

When I first became a reporter, I bought one of those little mics you could suction-cup to a telephone to record interviews. That was some gadget, except for having to tape it to the handset because the suction cup sometimes popped off. You can still buy this kind of microphone or use your smartphone with […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)


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New iPhone app Yallo lets you record your conversations