iOS 8.1: ‘Text Message Forwarding’ Activation Requires iMessage Email Address [iOS Blog]

Earlier today, Apple released iOS 8.1 which introduced number of new features to iOS and Yosemite. One of the anticipated features was SMS Text Message Forwarding, which allows SMS messages received by your iPhone to be mirrored on your iPad or Mac running OS X Yosemite.

Several of our forum members had difficulty activating the feature, as the required activation code would never appear on their Macs or iPads.

MacRumors reader Michael wrote in with this solution which requires an email address to be activated in iMessage:

…you need to have your email address turned on for iMessage on your iPhone in order to enable Text Message Forwarding. If you don’t, the numeric access code will not appear on your iPad or Mac during the setup process. As soon as you enable your email address for iMessage (you only need to do this on your iPhone) the numeric access codes appear as expected. Once you have text message forwarding setup you can disable your email address again in iMessage as it seems to only be necessary for the numeric access code setup step, not the actual text message forwarding itself.

MacRumors was able to verify this scenario and found that an email address does indeed have to be active on your iPhone for the activation message to properly be sent. In our testing, SMS messages were still received after the email address was removed from iMessage. The setting to add your email address to iMessage is under Settings -> Messages -> Send & Receive. Note, you may have to wait a few moments after adding an email address before the activation code will send.




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Apple absolutely needs to put this awesome ‘Good Samaritan’ feature into iOS

With iOS 7, Apple already has the best anti-theft software protection of any smartphone in the business. If you lose your iPhone, or it’s stolen, you can easily use Find My iPhone to see where it’s last reported coordinates are,…Read more ›



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Apple Says iMessage Interception Would Require Re-Engineering Systems, Has No Interest in Doing So

Yesterday, researchers made a presentation at the Hack in the Box conference arguing that Apple’s iMessage system could theoretically allow Apple or another party to intercept the encrypted messages. The concern stems in part from Apple’s use of a private server for storing users’ public keys used to encrypt messages, meaning that senders have no way of knowing whether a potentially false key has been inserted in order to intercept messages intended for a different recipient.

In a statement to AllThingsD, Apple once again denies that it can read iMessages, noting that it would require the service’s systems to be re-engineered and that the company has no interest in doing so.

Apple says that QuarksLab’s theory is just that — a theory, and one that would require a rearchitecting of iMessage for it ever to be a threat in the real world.

“iMessage is not architected to allow Apple to read messages,” said Apple spokeswoman Trudy Muller said in a statement to AllThingsD. “The research discussed theoretical vulnerabilities that would require Apple to re-engineer the iMessage system to exploit it, and Apple has no plans or intentions to do so.”

Apple’s statement does not actually refute the original claim, simply confirming that as the service is currently configured it is impossible for Apple to intercept iMessages. The researchers’ argument rests on the observation that changes could be made to Apple’s systems to allow for iMessages to be intercepted without users being aware of the changes.

The result is that Apple is arguing users should trust that the company has no interest in making such changes, and if users take Apple at its word, the researchers’ concerns remain merely theoretical. But some users may remained concerned that Apple could be quietly compelled to make changes by government security agencies, compromising Apple’s touted „secure end-to-end encryption“ for iMessage.




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Issues With iMessage After Updating To iOS 7? Here’s How To Fix Them

It seems a lot of users who upgraded to iOS 7 last month are having issues with iMessage. Apple’s Support Communities forums are full of complaints from disgruntled iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch users who cannot send or receive iMessages anymore, and you’ll find plenty of people voicing their frustrations on Twitter, too. Initially it […]

The post Issues With iMessage After Updating To iOS 7? Here’s How To Fix Them appeared first on Cult of Mac.




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Users Experiencing Extended iMessage, iCloud Service Outages

Apple’s official Services, Stores, and iCloud status page is reporting that multiple services are experiencing an outage that is affecting “less than 1% of users”. Among the services down are iMessage, Photo Stream, and Documents in the Cloud, and according to Apple the services have been out for over eight hours now.

Multiple Services – Less than 1% of users are affected

Users may be unable to use iCloud Documents, Photo Stream, iPhoto Journals, or Backup & Restore. Users may also be unable to send or download attachments in iMessage.

Apple’s verious cloud services have experienced occasional downtime, although outages extending for this length of time are fairly unusual. This extended outage does, however, only appear to be affecting a relatively small number of users.

Last month, Apple’s Developer Center was completely down for over a week due to a security breach, with Apple taking over three weeks to bring those services fully back online.




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Apple to Update AppleCare with Subscription Service and In-Store Repair Options

Apple has some changes in store for its service and support program AppleCare, according to a report from AppleInsider.

The site claims Apple held a town hall session yesterday that outlined a number of changes to AppleCare that will soon be rolling out across the U.S. first, and then internationally at a later date.

„The biggest announcement, was the way repairs for iPhones will be handled soon,“ the person, who asked not to be identified due to their active status as an Apple employee, told AppleInsider. „The way it is now, if almost anything is wrong with an iPhone, iPod, or iPad, the entire device is exchanged for a like-new re manufactured (sic) device, whether brought into an apple store or sent in for mail in repair. Now we are starting to actually repair the products and return the same device to the customer.“

Currently, Apple Stores have the tools to replace speakers, receivers, home buttons, the vibrator motor and battery. Come June, capabilities will be expanded to display replacement, and by July cameras, sleep/wake buttons and logic boards will be dealt with in-store.

By replacing parts on defective iPhones instead of replacing the units entirely, Apple reportedly hopes to save $1 billion per year.

The site also says Apple will be changing its AppleCare service – which currently attaches to individual devices, requiring customers to buy a new AppleCare plan for each computer and iOS device they purchase – into a subscription service that will attach to a particular customer instead of a product. Apple’s One to One program works in a similar manner.

The new subscription service could include „exclusive“ 24/7 support, though AppleInsider notes that the feature set is not finalized yet and could still change. The complimentary support structure could be changing as well. Currently, Apple includes free phone support for 90 days with every product. The new AppleCare could extend that support to a year or more, and possibly include new live support options such as chat via iMessage.

No information on pricing was available, though the changes are supposed to be rolled out in the U.S. this fall.

The last big change to AppleCare was the introduction of AppleCare+ for iPhones and iPads.


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WhatsApp for iPhone Moving to Subscription Model Later This Year [iOS Blog]

TechCrunch reports that WhatsApp CEO Jan Koum has revealed in an interview with Dutch journalist Alexander Klopping that WhatsApp Messenger for iPhone will be moving to a subscription model by the end of the year.

The new subscription model would apply to new users, Koum said, and would likely follow the same pricing structure as its other apps, which are free for the first year and then cost $1/year, compared to the single, for-life $0.99 purchase that users make on iOS today. “We’re relaxed on dates, but definitely this year. It’s on the road map,” Koum said.

When asked why the company was making the change, Koum responded that they wanted „to keep things simple,“ probably referring to wanting to have a standard pricing model across all platforms.

WhatsApp is an immensely popular cross-platform messaging app that sees 17 billion messages sent daily, which is over eight times as many as Apple’s 2 billion messages sent daily on iMessage.

As of right now, WhatsApp for iPhone is still available for $0.99 on the App Store. [Direct Link]


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