Robert F. Kennedy’s optimism lives on at Apple, Tim Cook says

Tim Cook accepted the Ripple of Hope Award in New York last night. During his speech at the the benefit for the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights, the Apple CEO touched on a number of world issues, from protections for the LGBT community, to the Syrian refugee criss. Cook also cited […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)


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Aaron Sorkin on ‘Steve Jobs’: ‘I Think We Made a Good Movie’

In a new interview with Wired, screenwriter Aaron Sorkin spoke freely on his job of being hired to pen the new Steve Jobs movie and all of the issues he had to face in writing about a person he didn’t know much about. Sorkin’s initial fear of tackling the film – hesitant to use the term „biopic“ – was in adapting Walter Isaacson’s comprehensive biography of Jobs into a traditional, three act structure, which he wasn’t entirely comfortable with.

When you’re doing a biopic, it’s very hard to shake the cradle-to-grave structure that audiences are so familiar with. People are going to come into the theater knowing that first we’re going to see a little boy with his father, and he’s looking into the window of the electronics store, and then we’re going to hit these famous signposts along the way in Steve Jobs’ life. Also, I’m not really a screenwriter; I’m a playwright who pretends to be a screenwriter. I’m most comfortable writing in claustrophobic pieces of geography and periods of time.

It was then that Sorkin emailed producer Scott Rudin, and pitched him the idea of taking some factual liberties with three of Jobs’ biggest product launches, and identifying „five or six conflicts in Steve’s life and have those conflicts play themselves out in these scenes backstage—in places where they didn’t take place.” Sorkin also hopes that the fans who are pre-judging the movie give it a chance and see that it won’t be „one big champagne toast to Steve Jobs.“

The screenwriter decided to use Jobs’ daughter Lisa as one of the doors into the former Apple CEO’s life, finding his initial refusal to accept paternity of his daughter hard to get past, but noting its integral quality to the backbone of the movie. Wired also asked Sorkin about his apparent growing reputation in Hollywood as the „go-to guy for the binary system,“ thanks to his work on another technology-inspired true-life story The Social Network.

This isn’t an origin story or an invention story. It’s not about how the Mac was invented. And The Social Network wasn’t about the technology that went into creating Facebook. Nonetheless, I knew that there was going to be no way I could write this movie without a lot of tutors. There are lines that I wrote in the movie that I don’t understand.

Ultimately, as the movie grows closer to release, Sorkin knows that Steve Jobs may be a divisive experience for a lot of fans of Apple.

There are going to be people who say we were rough on him, and there are going to be people who say we weren’t rough enough on him. But I think we made a good movie, and I think that if you asked 10 writers to write 10 movies about Steve Jobs, you’d get 10 different movies that wouldn’t resemble one another.

There have been a handful of stories in the news about the soon-to-be-released film, including some new behind-the-scenes footage and cast interviews, a public dispute between Sorkin and Apple CEO Tim Cook, and even the first reactions to the film as it made its debut at film festivals across the country.

The full Wired interview goes more in-depth with Sorkin, touching on topics like the film’s casting drama behind the scenes and even last year’s Sony hack and the repercussions it had for Steve Jobs and its cast and crew.



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‘The (R)evolution of Steve Jobs’ Opera Set to Premiere in 2017

The Santa Fe Opera yesterday announced a new opera coming from composer Mason Bates and librettist Mark Campbell in 2017, set to detail the complicated personal and professional life of former Apple CEO Steve Jobs (via LA Times). Titled „The (R)evolution of Steve Jobs,“ the opera is planned to include characters not only from Jobs’ work life, but his personal life as well, including his father, wife, and even detail the troubled relationship with his daughter Lisa Brennan-Jobs.

This September the opera will be workshopped in San Francisco, with the Santa Fe Opera partnering with Cal Performances at UC Berkeley and the San Francisco Conservatory of Music to put on the first show. Since his death in 2011, Jobs’ personal and professional life has been the subject of multiple books, documentaries, and films. The most recent of which – Danny Boyle’s Steve Jobs film – is set for a release on October 9 after premiering a week earlier at the 53rd Annual New York Film Festival.



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Raising a daughter is even tougher when she’s a zombie

What happens when your daughter is infected by the zombie virus? You love her, and you want to save her. Unfortunately, you’ll probably have to kill her. Action-hero and California governor Schwarzenegger stars in the upcoming Maggie, a gritty, realistic,…Read more ›



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Upcoming ‘Modern Family’ Episode Shot Entirely on iPhone and iPad Cameras

The upcoming February 25 episode of ABC’s multiple Emmy-winning sitcom „Modern Family“ will take place solely on a MacBook screen (via The Verge). The episode, being shot by director and series co-creator Steve Levitan, used an iPhone 6 and iPad Air 2 to shoot every scene.

The episode’s story focuses on Claire Dunphy’s (Julie Bowen) attempt to reach her daughter Haley (Sarah Hyland) by contacting various other members of the Dunphy/Pritchett clan via multiple forms of MacBook apps, all while stuck in an airport.

The show will not only use various chat apps like Apple’s own FaceTime and Messages, but include references to everything from Reminders to the now-obsolete iPhoto. Levitan mentioned that the idea for the episode came from his own experience communicating with his kids in college through the vast array of chat software available today.

„I have two daughters at college, and we do a lot of FaceTiming,“ he said at a recent press event in Los Angeles. He was working one day with a number of emails and websites open on his machine, when a video chat from his daughter popped up. On the screen he saw his work, his daughter, himself, and his wife doing something behind him all at the same time. „And I realized on that screen you could tell so much about my life. So the original idea was from there.“

The show has been a proponent of Apple-related gadgets in the past, with an early-series episode mostly dedicated to Claire’s attempt to get Phil the original iPad. Apple was even reported to lend the show a slew of iPhones, iPads, and MacBook Pros for shooting the video chats and for allowing the show’s editors to conduct post-production work once the shoot was done.

The episode has been so long in production – with motion graphics artist John Brown at the head – the team had been working on it since OS X Yosemite itself was in beta. „It was frustrating to be like, ‘Act one, totally locked,’ and then come in Monday and hear the FaceTime notification has changed,“ Brown said.

Besides a few slight liberties to the Apple OS X platform, including giving FaceTime the ability to handle multiple calls at once and a few aesthetic alterations to Yosemite’s transparency options, The Verge reports the environment created by the episode „felt all too familiar.“

The episode, entitled „Connection Lost“ airs Wednesday, February 25 on ABC.




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