Mobile developers: Here’s your chance to learn Swift, and fast

For any mobile developer, learning Swift is a must. It’s an intuitive and fast language that’s key to iOS, OS X, tvOS, and watchOS. This bundle of four lessons — in the form of 3 apps and an E-book — will get you up to speed in practicing coding, testing scripts, and more. And the […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)


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Tim Cook Calls Chromebooks ‘Test Machines’, Discusses Testing at Hour of Code Event

Apple CEO Tim Cook today spent some time at a New York City Apple Store during its Hour of Code event, commenting on what Apple hopes for the future of education and discussing the success of Google’s Chromebooks in the education market.

In an interview with BuzzFeed, Cook was asked about Google’s Chromebooks overtaking Apple’s iPads as the most popular devices in American classrooms. Cook said that Apple wouldn’t be following Google’s strategy in the education market, calling the lower-priced Chrombooks that have taken over American classrooms „test machines.“

BuzzFeed notes that Cook is alluding to one reason Chromebooks have gained in popularity in the education market. As schools turn to computerized testing their need for cheap devices with integrated keyboards and trackpads has increased, rather than tablets that cost more, like Apple’s iPads. Apple, says Cook, is not interested in advancing testing.

Instead, Cook said that Apple is interested in „helping students learn and teachers teach, but tests, no.“ Apple wants to create products „that allow kids to learn how to create and engage on a different level.“

In an interview with Mashable at the same event, Cook expounded his thoughts on testing, saying that the classroom of the future is based around problem-solving, creating and learning how to express yourself.

“I’m not a fan of teaching to the test,” said Cook, “I think creativity is so important. Training the mind how to think is so important. Teaching to the test, to me, is too much about memorization. In a word where you’ve got all the information you’ve got right here,” Cook gestured to my iPhone, “your ability to memorize what year a war was won and all this kind of stuff isn’t very relevant.”

The education market has long been important to Apple. More recently, Apple has promoted iPads in the classroom with education profiles showing how some educators are using the device to teach their students. In March, the Cupertino company overhauled its iPad education program to simplify sharing and apps.

Tag: education
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Tim Cook on New iPhone 6s Battery Case: ‘I Wouldn’t Call it the Hump’

Apple CEO Tim Cook attended one of Apple’s Hour of Code events in New York this afternoon, where he spoke to Mashable‘s Lance Ulanoff about the new iPhone 6s Smart Battery Case, which debuted yesterday.

Ulanoff asked Cook if he was excited about the „hump,“ a mocking nickname people have given to the battery case due to its distinctive shape. In response, Tim Cook said he was aware of the comments people were making about the case. „You know, I probably wouldn’t call it ‘the hump,'“ Cook said.

Cook went on to point out the malleability of the new Smart Battery Case in comparison to other battery cases. It’s made of a soft silicone that makes it easy to put on and remove, unlike more rigid cases from third-party companies.

Cook was pointing out the issue with cases, like those from Mophie, that are so rigid it takes considerable strength and patience to put them on and take them off.

„If you make this solid all the way across,“ said Cook, indicating the spots where the Apple case’s embedded battery stops and you just have the soft fluoroelastomer casing, „in order to get it on, you’d find it very difficult to get it on and off.“

„So the guys had this great insight to put the bend in along with making it a smart case,“ Cook explained.

Cook also commented on the viewpoint that the case is an admission the iPhone 6s battery is too small, saying most people who charge their iPhones every day won’t need the case. „But if you’re out hiking and you go on overnight trips… it’s kind of nice to have,“ he said.

Apple introduced its iPhone 6s Smart Battery Case yesterday morning, and its distinctive humped design quickly led to derision and negative comments from iPhone users. Reviews of the Smart Battery Case were also not overly positive as the case doesn’t have enough capacity to fully recharge an iPhone and it’s missing some features that are found in third-party battery cases.

Apple’s Smart Battery Case for the iPhone 6s is priced at $99 and is available from the online Apple Store and Apple retail locations.

Tags: Tim Cook, iPhone 6s Smart Battery Case
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Coding is the next level of literacy, says Apple software boss

Teaching your kids how to code is pretty much as important as teaching them to write, according to Apple’s senior VP of Software Engineering, Craig Federighi, in an interview promoting the company’s Hour of Code project. Apple is turning all of its retail locations into coding centers for kids this week. The classes will offer […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)


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Apple’s Swift programming language goes open source

Swift, the fast growing computer programming language created by Apple, is officially going open source starting today. Apple unveiled Swift at WWDC in 2014 with a promise to make it open source in the future. Now that the language has become one of the fastest adopted languages in history, the company announced this morning that the […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)


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Apple’s Swift programming language goes open source

Swift, the fast growing computer programming language created by Apple, is officially going open source starting today. Apple unveiled Swift at WWDC in 2014 with a promise to make it open source in the future. Now that the language has become one of the fastest adopted languages in history, the company announced this morning that the […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)


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Apple’s Swift Programming Language Now Open Source

As promised, Apple has officially made its Swift programming language open source, making the project available through Swift.org.

We are excited by this new chapter in the story of Swift. After Apple unveiled the Swift programming language, it quickly became one of the fastest growing languages in history. Swift makes it easy to write software that is incredibly fast and safe by design. Now that Swift is open source, you can help make the best general purpose programming language available everywhere.

Announced at WWDC 2014 and launched alongside iOS 8 and OS X Yosemite a few months later, Swift marks a significant step forward from the Objective-C previously favored by Apple.

On December 3, 2015, the Swift language, supporting libraries, debugger, and package manager were published under the Apache 2.0 license with a Runtime Library Exception, and Swift.org was created to host the project. The source code is hosted on GitHub where it is easy for anyone to get the code, build it themselves, and even create pull requests to contribute code back to the project. Everyone is welcome, even just to file a bug report. There are excellent Getting Started guides available here on the site as well.

The project is governed by a core team of engineers that drive the strategic direction by working with the community, and a collection of code owners responsible for the day-to-day project management. Technical leaders come from the community of contributors and anyone can earn the right to lead an area of Swift. The Community Guidelines includes detailed information on how the Swift community is managed.

With the open sourcing of Swift, Apple has also released a Linux port to expand access to the language. Apple has also begun sharing design guidelines related to the upcoming Swift 3, setting the stage for „a more cohesive feel to Swift development.“

Tag: Swift
Discuss this article in our forums

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Apple’s Swift Programming Language Now Open Source

As promised, Apple has officially made its Swift programming language open source, making the project available through Swift.org.

We are excited by this new chapter in the story of Swift. After Apple unveiled the Swift programming language, it quickly became one of the fastest growing languages in history. Swift makes it easy to write software that is incredibly fast and safe by design. Now that Swift is open source, you can help make the best general purpose programming language available everywhere.

Announced at WWDC 2014 and launched alongside iOS 8 and OS X Yosemite a few months later, Swift marks a significant step forward from the Objective-C previously favored by Apple.

On December 3, 2015, the Swift language, supporting libraries, debugger, and package manager were published under the Apache 2.0 license with a Runtime Library Exception, and Swift.org was created to host the project. The source code is hosted on GitHub where it is easy for anyone to get the code, build it themselves, and even create pull requests to contribute code back to the project. Everyone is welcome, even just to file a bug report. There are excellent Getting Started guides available here on the site as well.

The project is governed by a core team of engineers that drive the strategic direction by working with the community, and a collection of code owners responsible for the day-to-day project management. Technical leaders come from the community of contributors and anyone can earn the right to lead an area of Swift. The Community Guidelines includes detailed information on how the Swift community is managed.

With the open sourcing of Swift, Apple has also released a Linux port to expand access to the language. Apple has also begun sharing design guidelines related to the upcoming Swift 3, setting the stage for „a more cohesive feel to Swift development.“

Tag: Swift
Discuss this article in our forums

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