Apple Will Fix ‘January 1, 1970’ Date Bug in Upcoming iOS Update

Apple has officially acknowledged the „1970“ date bug affecting 64-bit iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch devices. The support document does not identify a current fix, but Apple said that an upcoming iOS software update will prevent the issue from occurring in the future.

Manually changing the date to May 1970 or earlier can prevent your iOS device from turning on after a restart. An upcoming software update will prevent this issue from affecting iOS devices. If you have this issue, contact Apple Support.

Manually changing an iOS device’s date to January 1, 1970 results in a continuous reboot cycle, effectively bricking the device. Restoring through iTunes in DFU Mode also does not appear to work.

Apple has not provided a reason for the bug, but YouTube video maker and programmer Tom Scott speculates that setting the date close to January 1, 1970, which is 0 in Unix time, may be resulting in an integer underflow – in this case, a date prior to January 1, 1970.

iOS then handles the underflow by returning the negative integrer to the maximum value, which Scott says results in a date that is some 20 times longer than the universe is expected to last. Scott believes iOS may have difficulties handling this large number, resulting in affected devices crashing.

German website Apfelpage.de shared a second YouTube video showing that opening an iPhone and resetting its battery could fix the problem, but this method could damage your smartphone and void your warranty if done incorrectly. The safer option may be to visit a Genius Bar or contact Apple Support online or by phone.

iOS is a Unix-based operating system, and Unix time starts at 00:00:00 UTC on January 1, 1970. Apple does not allow you to manually set your iOS device to a date prior to then, likely in an effort to prevent a bug like this, but changing the date to May 1970 or earlier still causes issues on 64-bit devices.
Discuss this article in our forums

Continued here:  

Apple Will Fix ‘January 1, 1970’ Date Bug in Upcoming iOS Update

Apple confirms it’s working on a fix for ‘1970’ iPhone bug

Apple has acknowledged the existence of a somewhat bizarre bug which bricks any iOS devices that has its date set back to 1970 — and confirms that a fix is on the way. “An upcoming software update will prevent this issue from affecting iOS devices,” Apple notes on one of its support pages. While there’s […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)


View article: 

Apple confirms it’s working on a fix for ‘1970’ iPhone bug

Apple Hit With Class Action Lawsuit for iPhone 5 Wi-Fi Defect That Caused Data Overages

Apple today was hit by a class action lawsuit from iPhone 5 and 5s users on AT&T’s network. The lawsuit alleges that the Cupertino company knowingly concealed a defect in the iPhone 5 and 5s that caused the devices to use LTE data even when connected to a Wi-Fi network.

In September 2012, some iPhone 5 users noticed the bug after finding that they were going through more data than usual. Shortly after the issue came to light, Apple and Verizon issued a fix for the bug, with Verizon confirming that users affected by the bug would not be charged for their data use.

However, according to an investigation by law firm Hagens Berman, Apple and AT&T never issued a fix nor did they acknowledge the defect. The firm and plaintiff Thomas Palmer believe that Apple should not have kept the fix from AT&T customers, and that the company failed to address the issue even as it released iOS 7 and the iPhone 5s.

We believe Apple should not have withheld this repair for AT&T Wireless subscribers for any period of time. By withholding this information and repair, consumers were unaware of the defect and were left to sort out high cellular data charges with their wireless carriers.

Specifically, the law firm says the defect occurred when a user streamed „high volumes of data“ for 10 to 20 minutes. In this case, the GPU would take over all video decompression, decoding and presentation to the display. Because of this, the CPU was not needed and would go to „sleep“ to conserve battery life. When the CPU went to sleep, the defect caused both the iPhone 5 and 5s to switch from streaming data via Wi-Fi to LTE.

Tag: iPhone 5
Discuss this article in our forums

Link – 

Apple Hit With Class Action Lawsuit for iPhone 5 Wi-Fi Defect That Caused Data Overages

Rivals pile on to mock Apple’s ugly iPhone battery case

Apple made a minor design faux pas with its newly-launched iPhone Smart Battery Case, so of course all of the company’s rivals are doing the mature thing and getting on with their own work, knowing that joining the pile-on will only come back to bite them. Wait — that’s not what’s happening at all! In […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)


View the original here – 

Rivals pile on to mock Apple’s ugly iPhone battery case

Tim Cook on New iPhone 6s Battery Case: ‘I Wouldn’t Call it the Hump’

Apple CEO Tim Cook attended one of Apple’s Hour of Code events in New York this afternoon, where he spoke to Mashable‘s Lance Ulanoff about the new iPhone 6s Smart Battery Case, which debuted yesterday.

Ulanoff asked Cook if he was excited about the „hump,“ a mocking nickname people have given to the battery case due to its distinctive shape. In response, Tim Cook said he was aware of the comments people were making about the case. „You know, I probably wouldn’t call it ‘the hump,'“ Cook said.

Cook went on to point out the malleability of the new Smart Battery Case in comparison to other battery cases. It’s made of a soft silicone that makes it easy to put on and remove, unlike more rigid cases from third-party companies.

Cook was pointing out the issue with cases, like those from Mophie, that are so rigid it takes considerable strength and patience to put them on and take them off.

„If you make this solid all the way across,“ said Cook, indicating the spots where the Apple case’s embedded battery stops and you just have the soft fluoroelastomer casing, „in order to get it on, you’d find it very difficult to get it on and off.“

„So the guys had this great insight to put the bend in along with making it a smart case,“ Cook explained.

Cook also commented on the viewpoint that the case is an admission the iPhone 6s battery is too small, saying most people who charge their iPhones every day won’t need the case. „But if you’re out hiking and you go on overnight trips… it’s kind of nice to have,“ he said.

Apple introduced its iPhone 6s Smart Battery Case yesterday morning, and its distinctive humped design quickly led to derision and negative comments from iPhone users. Reviews of the Smart Battery Case were also not overly positive as the case doesn’t have enough capacity to fully recharge an iPhone and it’s missing some features that are found in third-party battery cases.

Apple’s Smart Battery Case for the iPhone 6s is priced at $99 and is available from the online Apple Store and Apple retail locations.

Tags: Tim Cook, iPhone 6s Smart Battery Case
Discuss this article in our forums

Originally posted here: 

Tim Cook on New iPhone 6s Battery Case: ‘I Wouldn’t Call it the Hump’

Apple’s iPhone battery case isn’t the first time it’s ‘bumped’ a thin design

To the derision of the entire internet, Apple’s new Smart Battery Case for the iPhone has an inelegant hump on the back. Turns out, this isn’t the first time Apple design chief Jony Ive and his team have “humped” a thin design. The Twentieth Anniversary Mac, released in January 1997, was one of the first major projects given to […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)


Visit site – 

Apple’s iPhone battery case isn’t the first time it’s ‘bumped’ a thin design

Apple’s official Smart Battery Case will keep your iPhone juiced up

Apple today unveiled a surprise new $99 iPhone “Smart Battery Case,” available in white and charcoal gray — designed to not only protect your iPhone 6s or iPhone 6, but also to give it considerably longer battery life. While Apple does not give specific battery capacity details, it notes that the battery case offers increased […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)


More – 

Apple’s official Smart Battery Case will keep your iPhone juiced up