Apple Developing iPhone With Extended Range Wireless Charging for as Soon as 2017

Apple is reportedly developing a wirelessly-charged iPhone for as soon as 2017, according to Bloomberg. The company is working with its partners in both the U.S. and Asia to create the technology.

Apple is exploring cutting-edge technologies that would allow iPhones and iPads to be powered from further away than the charging mats used with current smartphones, the people said, asking not to be identified as the details are private. The iPhone maker is looking to overcome technical barriers including loss of power over distance with a decision on implementing the technology still being assessed, they said.

Current wirelessly-charged devices require users to place their phones or other devices on charging mats. In September 2012, Apple marketing chief Phil Schiller said that the company wasn’t sure of how convenient wireless charging is as most wireless charging systems still have to be plugged into a wall.

In early January, it was reported that Apple was working on wireless charging for the iPhone 7. However, that report warned that the feature could be pulled from the iPhone 7 for a future iteration of the device as Apple is working on the technology currently.

Apple has held an interest in wireless charging since the first iPhone, gaining patents for wireless charging stations and wireless charging through a near field magnetic resonance, which wirelessly charges a device within a certain region. The Cupertino company has also shown an interest in WiTricity’s wireless charging technology, which uses „hidden charging“ technology that allows magnetic fields to wrap around barriers. This allows users to place their charging pads wherever they want.

Last November it was reported that the iPhone 7 would see the removal of the 3.5mm headphone jack for an all-in-one Lightning connector that allows users to both power their device and plug in headphones. While the removal of the 3.5mm headphone jack would mean that Apple would be able to make the iPhone thinner, it would not allow users to listen to headphones and charge their phone at the same time. A proprietary wireless charging solution from Apple in future iPhones with all-in-one Lightning connectors would likely allow for that.

Related Roundup: iPhone 6s
Tags: wireless charging, bloomberg.com
Buyer’s Guide: iPhone (Neutral)
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Apple has reportedly suspended plans to add an Internet-based live television service for Apple TV, maintaining its focus on providing media from other companies. A person familiar with negotiations claims that Apple’s plan to sell a $30-$40 monthly package of exclusive television stations has run into problems — based on the amount of money content […]

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CBS CEO Again Says Network Will ‘Probably’ Reach Streaming TV Deal With Apple

CBS CEO Les Moonves says the network is still in negotiations with Apple over its inclusion in Apple’s upcoming streaming television service, reports Bloomberg. In an interview with Bloomberg TV this morning, Moonves said CBS has had conversations with Apple and will „probably“ ink a deal with the Cupertino company.

„Apple is having conversations with everyone about doing their own streaming services,“ Moonves said in an interview Wednesday on Bloomberg TV. „We have had those conversations, as have the other networks. Do I think something will happen? Probably, but I do not know when.“

Moonves made similar comments five months ago at Re/code’s Code Conference, saying CBS would „probably“ sign a deal with Apple for its rumored streaming television service. „We’re very excited about it,“ he said, and at that time, he confirmed he had met with Eddy Cue to discuss the plans as part of an „ongoing conversation.“

Given the similarity between the statement given in May and what Moonves had to say today, there is little evidence of any progress in the talks between Apple and content owners, but it’s clear there is still interest in reaching a deal.

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Apple’s web-based television service was initially rumored to be launching in 2015, perhaps alongside the new Apple TV, but a continued failure to secure all of the necessary deals has reportedly delayed its debut until 2016. Apple is said to be having trouble with content negotiations, with pricing being a sticking point.

Apple’s plan is to offer a selection of popular television channels at a price of $30 to $40 per month, a price tag that undercuts most cable television services. While Apple’s streaming television service is still in the works with a launch date unknown, the company’s new set-top box will be launching at the end of the month.

The new Apple TV is already in developer hands and will be available to the general public in late October. The device includes a full App Store, universal search, deep Siri integration, and a touch-based remote for navigating the interface and playing games.



Apple May Lose Monitor in E-Book Price Fixing Lawsuit

The U.S. Justice Department yesterday recommended that the court-appointed monitor placed on Apple during the price-fixing e-book case that began two years ago does not need to be extended (via Bloomberg). The Justice Department said that it’s largely satisfied with Apple’s response of reforms and compliance with the antitrust laws, even though it believes the Cupertino-based company had internal fights with the monitor assigned to them – Michael Bromwich – to ensure the sale of e-books went as the court appointed.

The government on Monday recommended that the monitoring not be extended. In a letter to the Manhattan federal judge who found in 2013 that Apple illegally conspired with publishers to set e-book prices, the U.S. said Apple has “now implemented meaningful antitrust policies, procedures, and training programs that were obviously lacking at the time Apple participated in and facilitated the horizontal price-fixing conspiracy found by this court.”

Apple admitted that the interactions between the company and its monitor were „rocky at times,“ but disagreed with the Justice Department’s claim of being uncooperative. Apple ultimately feels committed to seeing the case through to the end, stating in a joint letter to U.S. District Judge Denise Cote that “Over the past two years, Apple has developed and implemented a comprehensive, engaging, and effective antitrust compliance program.”

Apple in May lost its legal challenge to the appointment of monitor Michael Bromwich, a former Justice Department inspector general. The relationship between Apple and Bromwich was contentious from the start, with Apple claiming the monitor asked prematurely to interview Apple directors and submitted excessive bills. Bromwich complained of foot-dragging and lack of cooperation from Apple executives.

The case began back in 2013, when a court ruled that Apple conspired to artificially inflate e-book prices on its own iBooks store, with an estimated $500 million fine. The most recent development in the trial came in June, when Apple lost an appeal it filed last December and was fined a total of $450 million by federal judge Debra Ann Livingston.



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