$300 3D printer lets kids design and print their own toys

It’s easy to assume that traditional kid’s toys are taking a beating due to the sky-high popularity of tablets and smartphones among the younger generation. But toy-maker Mattel is attempting to strike back with a concept that, honestly, sounds amazing: an affordable $300 3D printer designed to let your sprogs (or, let’s be honest, immature […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)


More: 

$300 3D printer lets kids design and print their own toys

Apple Music blasts onto Sonos speakers tomorrow

Apple Music becomes an official part of the Sonos ecosystem Wednesday after months of beta testing on the wireless speakers. “The feedback from Apple Music members on Sonos during the beta period has been great,” said Eddy Cue, Apple’s senior vice president of internet software and services, in a press release. “Sonos plus Apple Music […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)


Taken from – 

Apple Music blasts onto Sonos speakers tomorrow

Amazon Echo adds Spotify to its musical repertoire

Amazon’s Echo smart speaker just upped its music game, adding Spotify streaming to its ever-growing list of skills. Now playing your favorite artists and playlists is just a voice command away — at least if you’re a Spotify Premium subscriber. “Now playing your favorite music from Spotify is as easy as asking Alexa,” said Toni […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)


Jump to original:

Amazon Echo adds Spotify to its musical repertoire

Review: Stylish Danny P. Leather Wallet Holds iPhone 6/6s Plus, Cards and Cash

Accessory maker Danny P. seeks to give iPhone 6 Plus and 6s Plus users some dual usability with its new Leather Wallet with iPhone 6 Plus Case, which includes seven credit/debit card slots, a rear folder for cash, and a sleeve for the larger-sized iPhone. The case, which is available through Apple’s own online store, is sized at 6.81 inches tall with a width of about 4.13 inches and is aimed to remain slim and unobtrusive even when stocked with an iPhone and various credit cards.

After a week of use, I’ve found that Danny P.’s Leather Wallet Case adheres to the company’s bullet point list of promises describing the case on its website, most notably in the satisfying quality of materials used to craft the iPhone accessory. Anyone with the pocket or bag real estate to house its vertically spacious design will easily find a lot to love in the case, especially those seeking an all-in-one housing solution for both monetary and iPhone protection needs.

Design

The left portion of the bifold holding the seven credit card slots on the inside of the Leather Wallet Case has an opening on the upper and right sides to hold a few dollars in cash, or any other slim pieces of paper or notes. The slot that actually holds the iPhone is a full sleeve, preventing access to the smartphone’s screen and inputs with the sole exception of the home button and Touch ID (if you slide it in upside down).

Like most sleeve cases, the inside of Danny P.’s product has a soft suede finish to make it easier to slide the iPhone in and out of the pocket, and prevent it from getting any scratches while housed there. The company’s logo is also admirably discreet on both the face of the wallet and at the bottom of the iPhone sleeve, although this is somewhat depending on the finish of the Italian leather used on each version of the case. Danny P. sent me the all-black option, and it’s perfect for anyone looking for an inconspicuous accessory.

When fully packed with seven credit, debit, and rewards cards, some cash, and the iPhone, the case’s thickness measured just under an inch for me on a day-to-day basis, which I found to be impressively non-bulky given the amount of content I placed inside. Danny P. also encourages the iPhone to be placed upside down as previously mentioned to access both the headphone jack and Touch ID for quick Apple Pay payments.

Size

As someone who uses a traditional bifold wallet, the Leather Wallet Case was a bit daunting initially in comparison to the smaller-sized wallets I’m used to. After using it for a few days, though, it surprised me how easily I became acclimated to the case’s size.

Of course, a lot of factors will change how much use I get out of it moving forward. For one, the Leather Wallet Case is mostly marketed to business-type people on-the-go, who have large breast pockets or bags at the ready on a daily basis. I’m not the target market there, but a few of my winter jackets and hoodies have helped the case go largely unnoticed.

Alternatively, trying to fit Danny P.’s case within the confines of jean pockets is more of a hassle. I was able to manage it, but that’s not what the enterprise-focused case is meant for, and it’s especially not recommended to have the nearly-seven-inch tall case protruding from the back pocket of your pants. I can see its size becoming a problem for me the closer I get to the warmer months, with the fewer jackets and overcoats I need to wear providing room for the case.

Leather Finish

As a company that not only trades in third-party tech products, but traditional clothing accessories as well, the Leather Wallet Case’s quality of material was easily my favorite part about using it each day. I’m normally a fan of color (the Brown/Blue version of the same case is definitely my favorite), but even the uniform black of the case sent for review won me over fairly quickly.

The leather is smooth and satisfying to touch, but tactile and grippy enough to make removing and adding credit cards a cinch. As Danny P. mentions on its FAQ page, the leather is a „living“ material that stretches out over time. So while the card slots were a bit tight at first, both the card slots and the iPhone sleeve were much easier to work with after just a week’s worth of breaking in. In regards to the space for cards, seven slots might not be enough for some, but it was actually the perfect number for me.

Those card slots feel nicely secure, but the open envelope section for cash wasn’t as reliable. A few times when I re-opened the wallet to check my phone or grab some cash, it would spill out onto the iPhone side of the case. Shoving money farther into the corner of the fold helps, but it also makes the cash harder to retrieve quickly.

iPhone Protection

The Danny P. case also provided dependable protection for my iPhone 6s Plus, even if it is overall somewhat rudimentary in execution. The sleeve housing the iPhone is expectedly tight to keep things secure, so don’t expect to fit the iPhone inside with a case on (I tried with Apple’s Leather Case and couldn’t make it past the camera).

As a result, the Leather Wallet Case provides no protection once you take the iPhone out of the sleeve, a feature I didn’t particularly love when checking my iPhone while out of the house. But as a simple sleeve, the biggest deal breaker for some might be the lack of immediate access to the iPhone’s screen while still inside the wallet.

Admittedly, this would be the the main reason for me ultimately switching back to a separate wallet and phone case solution as well, although anyone with an Apple Watch should have much of that required screen-checking alleviated. I tested notifications without my Apple Watch on and found the case does little to stifle the iPhone’s normal alert volume, but the same somewhat burdensome process of removing your iPhone just to see who is calling or texting still applies.

In terms of being a music companion, the design of the case allows access to the iPhone’s headphone jack, but anyone who prefers quick access to music controls outside of the inline music remote on Apple’s EarPods or other headphones will probably be more frustrated than not while using the Leather Wallet Case.

Apple Pay

Apple Pay worked essentially just as Danny P. promised it would on its site. With the Touch ID button exposed at the top of the Leather Wallet Case, all users have to do is double tap the home button with their Touch ID-approved finger and tap the case to an NFC terminal.

I tested the case out at my local GameStop, and only ran into one issue: the first time I didn’t double tap the Home button fast enough to bring up Apple Pay, and my iPhone unlocked. I had to take the iPhone out of the case, lock it, then put it back in for a second try, but when I was finally quick enough, Apple Pay registered my iPhone through Danny P.’s case like a charm. Without quick access to the screen and lock buttons, Touch ID’s blazing fast response on the iPhone 6s Plus is the Leather Wallet Case’s only potential hurdle to surpass in regards to Apple Pay.

Bottom Line

The three colors available for Danny P.’s Leather Wallet with iPhone 6 Plus Case – Brown, Brown/Blue, and Black – should provide enough of an aesthetic variety for anyone interested in the accessory. And since it’s a product that is far more publicly present than traditional wallets given its size, the smooth edges and fine leather finish easily make the case a universally sleek daily companion.

The caveat of course is that it still won’t win over anyone who simply doesn’t have the pocket or bag space for its size, which was built to accommodate the 5.5-inch screen of the iPhone 6 Plus and 6s Plus. It might be a niche market, but if you have a large-screened iPhone, are looking for a quality wallet case, and use a bag or jacket with sizable pockets on a daily basis, Danny P.’s accessory should be high on your purchase list.

Pros

Stylish design

High-quality leather

Minimal construction helps reduce bulk

Easily accessible credit/debit card slots

Apple Pay support

Secure iPhone sleeve

Cons

Sleeve prevents immediate access to iPhone screen

Fold for cash can result in disorganized spills

Opens bare iPhone to potential vulnerability when taken out of sleeve

Pricey

How to Buy

Danny P.’s Leather Wallet with iPhone 6 Plus Case can be purchased from both the company’s official website and on Apple’s online storefront for $129.95. Currently, users can only purchase the Black color option on Danny P.’s site, and the Brown version on Apple.com, while the color-blocked Blue/Brown version is available on both websites. Those interested in Danny P.’s style but without an iPhone 6/6s Plus should check out similar cases for the iPhone 6/6s, iPhone 5/5s, and a few MacBook Air and iPad sleeves sold by the company.

Tag: Danny P
Discuss this article in our forums

Original post: 

Review: Stylish Danny P. Leather Wallet Holds iPhone 6/6s Plus, Cards and Cash

CES 2016: Lutron ‘Serena’ and ‘Sivoia QS Triathlon’ Motorized Shades Now Support HomeKit

Lutron Electronics today at CES 2016 announced that its Serena and Sivoia QS Triathlon motorized window shades now support the HomeKit-enabled Caséta Wireless Smart Bridge.

The home automation system enables users to remotely control their Lutron shades using Siri on iPhone, iPad, iPod touch or Apple Watch. Homeowners can say commands such as „Hey Siri, turn on the lights“ or „Siri, open the shades,“ while Serena shades can also be set to desired levels with preset scenes like „Good Morning“ or „Good Night.“

Sivoia QS Triathlon shades require the professionally-installed Smart Bridge PRO:

The HomeKit-enabled Caséta Wireless Smart Bridge (a do-it-yourself solution) supports Serena battery-powered shades, while the Smart Bridge PRO (a professionally-installed solution) supports Lutron Sivoia QS Triathlon wireless shades (both roller and fashion honeycomb styles), plus Sivoia QS drapery tracks, the Kirbé vertical drapery system, tensioned shades, pleated shades and Roman shades.

Lutron’s Caséta Wireless Smart Bridge, available for $69.99 on Amazon (regular $150), launched as one of the first HomeKit accessories in June 2015, allowing homeowners to control lights in specific rooms or areas using Siri voice commands. Lutron accessories, sold by Apple and other resellers, can also be controlled with the free Lutron app or Pico wireless remote control.

Caséta Wireless kits and Lutron shading solutions are available now, starting at $80 and $349 respectively.

Tags: HomeKit, Lutron, CES 2016
Discuss this article in our forums

From: 

CES 2016: Lutron ‘Serena’ and ‘Sivoia QS Triathlon’ Motorized Shades Now Support HomeKit

BBC’s iPlayer app is finally available on Apple TV

BBC’s iPlayer app has landed on Apple TV in the U.K., joining the other streaming set top boxes — such as Roku, Google Chromecast and Amazon’s Fire TV — for which it was already available. The app includes a full catalog of programs from the past month, along with live-streaming of BBC TV stations, the ability to […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)


Taken from – 

BBC’s iPlayer app is finally available on Apple TV

Gorgeous headphone amp isn’t just ear candy

Lust List: Oppo HA-2 portable headphone amplifier and DAC What kind of audiophile nerd do you have to be to shell out 300 clams to “improve” your iPhone audio? Well, that’s what it is going to cost you to convert your digital audio into analog goodness with style. You can find cheaper options than the […]

(via Cult of Mac – Tech and culture through an Apple lens)


Read original article: 

Gorgeous headphone amp isn’t just ear candy

MacRumors Gift Guide by Marianne: Elevation Dock, Fluxmob Bolt, and More

To provide gift ideas for our readers this holiday season, we here at MacRumors have written gift guides based on our own experiences with products we like and recommend to others. If you want to catch up, here are links to the guides published so far: Juli Clover, Joe Rossignol, and Mitchel Broussard.

Here’s my selection of gift suggestions based on products I own, use often, and recommend to anyone looking for gift ideas for friends or family:

Elevation Dock for iPhone by Elevation Lab ($89)

I first heard about Elevation Lab’s iPhone dock through the company’s Kickstarter in 2011 and I backed the project there in order to receive one before they were commercially available. The dock, which is made out of a block of solid aluminum, was intended to be heavy enough to easily remove an iPhone with just one hand, and its design complemented Apple’s existing products beautifully. I have two Elevation Docks – one at my desk in front of my iMac and another on my nightstand – that I use every single day with my iPhone 6s. Elevation Lab currently offers the Elevation Dock 3 for the iPhone 6/6s and 6 Plus/6s Plus models. It’s pricey at $89 but I recommend it if you’ve got someone who appreciates the Apple design aesthetic and needs a solid, well-made iPhone dock.

Fluxmob Bolt battery backup and wall charger ($50)

I use my iPhone almost constantly most days and I’m oddly paranoid that the battery will die when I actually need it to make an emergency call or something else important. To allay this fear, I like to carry the means to charge my iPhone anywhere. However, I also like to streamline what I carry and prefer multipurpose items when possible, and a combination back-up battery and AC charger made sense. My search led me to Fluxmob’s Bolt, which is both a 3,000 mAh battery and an AC charger thanks to its built-in prongs, which stay hidden until you flip them out. The Bolt offers pass-through charging, which means that it can charge both its internal battery and and a connected iPhone at the same time when it’s plugged into an outlet, so I never have to worry about charging its battery separately. The Bolt, along with a retractable Lightning cable, are staples in my purse.

At $49.99, it’s a reasonably-priced gift for any heavy smartphone user on your gift list. Fluxmob also makes the Bolt2, a larger model with two USB ports and a 6,000 mAh internal battery that costs $79.99.

Jawbone Jambox Bluetooth speaker

I still have one of Apple’s iPod Hi-Fi speakers use it regularly with my iPhone. Though it can run on batteries and is meant to be somewhat portable, it’s not something I can throw in my bag. Jawbone was one of the first companies to release a portable Bluetooth speaker and I loved the idea and its design and bought one a few years ago and it’s still one of my most-used accessories. I bring it with me when I travel and have even had family members ask me if I could „accidentally“ forget it when I left.

Jawbone no longer makes the original Jambox that I have but you can buy a refurbished one directly from Jawbone for $47.99. The company now makes a smaller Mini Jambox (pictured above) and an extra-large Big Jambox, which cost $129.99 and $199.99 respectively at Jawbone’s site at the time of this post.

LG Pocket Photo printer ($120)

Though it pains me to admit it, I’m old enough to remember Polaroid cameras and the grainy, chemical-laden instant photos they could print. With my iPhone as my main camera, I wanted something that could duplicate that ability to quickly print a photo and found LG’s Pocket Photo printer. It connects to an iPhone via Bluetooth and is managed through LG’s Pocket Photo app. It uses inkless paper made by Zink and is small enough to throw in the small messenger bag I normally use every day. It prints 2-inch by 3-inch photos on paper with a peel-and-stick back so they can easily be used for scrapbooking, journals, greeting cards, and more.

LG doesn’t sell its Pocket Photo models directly in the US but you can get the latest PD251 model from Newegg for $119.99 (I have the previous generation PD239 model in a glorious Hello Kitty limited edition, thank you very much).

Fitbit One ($100)

Though the iPhone has step-tracking capabilities, I don’t carry it in a pocket consistently enough to use it as a step tracker. Also, I’d prefer my step tracker to be small and unobtrusive and as accurate as possible. After trying a wrist-based tracker, I switched to the Fitbit One a few years ago and it’s become an accessory I use every single day and even remember to clip to my pajamas to track my sleep. The companion Fitbit app is easy to use and I like the community aspect, particularly the challenges you can complete with friends, which are surprisingly motivating. I’m not fanatical enough about tracking my steps to take a walk just before midnight to meet my daily goal, but it does help me be cognizant of how active, or inactive, I am every day and plan something to increase my activity if I can.

The Fitbit One costs $99.95 directly from Fitbit, but it’s usually around $89 at Amazon.

We have a few more gift guides to publish, so stay tuned. In the meantime, feel free to add your own suggestions or find even more ideas for your own gift shopping lists with our MacRumors gift guide that was curated by readers.

Tag: gift guide
Discuss this article in our forums

Continue reading:  

MacRumors Gift Guide by Marianne: Elevation Dock, Fluxmob Bolt, and More