Create A Better Home Screen Icon For Web Sites With Mobile Safari [iOS Tips]

Ever go to add a website to your Home Screen in mobile Safari and notice it just looks like a jumbled, unidentifiable mess? This doesn’t happen too often any more, as most sites have learned how to create a special icon for Home Screen bookmarks on iOS, but every so often, you’ll come across a […]

The post Create A Better Home Screen Icon For Web Sites With Mobile Safari [iOS Tips] appeared first on Cult of Mac.


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Create A Better Home Screen Icon For Web Sites With Mobile Safari [iOS Tips]

Manually Update Your Apps In iOS 7 Beta [iOS TIps]

A promising feature of the upcoming iOS 7 is the automatic updating feature for apps. As Senator John McCain knows, manually updating ever sigle app on your iOS device–especially as you start to collect a bunch–can be a real time sink.

Fortunately, iOS 7 beta has the ability to just let all your apps update in the background, automagically, with nary a trip to the App Store UPdates tab to waste your time. HOwever, if you want to be able to pick and choose which apps to update, you’ll need to make a trip to the Settings app.

Launch Settings with a tap, and then scroll down to the iTunes & App Stores button. Tap it to go to that specifici preference screen, and then scroll down to the Automatic Downloads area. You’ll see the already in place Music, Apps, and Books auto-update toggles, and then you’ll see a new one: Updates. This is set to ON by default.

To turn off automatic updating for your apps, tap the toggle to OFF, which will change the toggle from a bright green to a pure white. There you go; no more automatic updates.

Now you’ll be able to hit the Updates tab in the App Store App to choose which apps to update, just like you do not in iOS 6.

The post Manually Update Your Apps In iOS 7 Beta [iOS TIps] appeared first on Cult of Mac.

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Manually Update Your Apps In iOS 7 Beta [iOS TIps]

Fix The Multiple Purchased Books Bug In iBooks On Your iPad [iOS Tips]

When I opened iBooks on my iPad mini the other day, I tapped the Collections button, and selected “Purchased Books” as my filter option, to see what I had in my account that I wanted to read. Oddly, I saw a ton of the same book, over and over, sitting on the shelves.

For some reason, this only happens on my iPad mini. My iPhone only shows one copy of each book, even when I select the same Purchased Books option. Same with my iPad 3. But, it’s still annoying on the mini, so I went online to try and figure out what was going on.

There is a bug here that other users are seeing, as well, and there’s really only one way to “fix it.”

Head into the Settings app on your iPad, and swipe down to the iBooks icon in the left-hand column. Tap the iBooks icon and yo’ll see all the options to the right.

Tap The Show All Purchases toggle to OFF, and then hit the Home button. Now, when you launch iBooks again on your iPad, it won’t give you the option to show the purchased books. When you tap Collections, you’ll only see Books, PDFs, and any other custom collections you’ve created to sort and shelve your epubs or iBooks.

Now, if you want to see what you’ve purchased, tap the Store button at the top of the iBooks shelf, and use the Purchased tab in the iBooks store to see what you can download.

While this doesn’t make the issue go away, it does keep the clutter down, especially if you have a significant number of Books in your Purchased account. Hopefully, this is not happening to you, and if it is, Apple will fix it soon.

Source: Apple Discussions

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Fix The Multiple Purchased Books Bug In iBooks On Your iPad [iOS Tips]

Challenge Your iPad-Owning Friends With Two Towers For Mac [OS X Tips]

Game Center, now on OS X as well as iOS, is Apple’s online leader board and game matching system. It lets you challenge your friends for both real-time as well as asynchronous multiplayer gaming, as well as give you bragging rights each time you beat out your frenemy’s high score on a Mac game you both play.

Did you know, however, that Game Center also lets you challenge your buddies on iOS, as well? With Two Towers, you can issue your challenge from your Mac, and your friend will be able to accept that challenge on their iPhone or iPad. You can then both play together, cross-platform. Cool, right? Here’s how to make it work.

Two Towers is a pretty deep strategy card game with some gorgeous hand-drawn artwork. The idea is to play cards and spells that weaken the enemy tower while defending and growing your own. The first tower to zero loses the game.

Download Two Towers onto your Mac from the Mac App Store. Enter your iTunes ID and password, and let it download to your Launchpad. Launch Two Towers from there, or from your Applications folder. Once inside, click the right-facing arrow to run through the “tutorial,” which is really kind of basic. Play a few single player games against your Mac to learn how to play the game, and win a few matches. Then you’ll be ready to challenge your GameCenter friends.

Click on the multiplayer button, which is a shield beneath two crossed swords. Next, click on the Search button at the bottom of the screen. A lovely green and faux-wood GameCenter window will pop up, letting you start an automatic game with a random player. To challenge a specific GameCenter buddy, click on the Invite Friends button on the bottom. You can only click on one friend at this point. Do so, and then click on the Next button. Type in a custom message, and then hit Send. Your friend will receive an invite on their iOS device if its logged into GameCenter, and they’ll then be able to accept the challenge, or download the game if they don’t already have it.

Now you’ll be playing a sweet little real-time match of Two Towers, one of you on a Mac, the other on iOS. Isn’t technology fun?

Source: App Store
Via: IGN

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Challenge Your iPad-Owning Friends With Two Towers For Mac [OS X Tips]

Five Tricky, Advanced Ways To Save Space On Your Mac Hard Drive [Feature]

So thin, so light, so…easy to fill with cruft.

Saving space on your Mac’s hard drive is more important than ever, especially if you use one with a faster but smaller solid state drive in it, like my Macbook Air. Being able to manage your space wisely is the key here, and once you’ve done the obvious things, like pare down your Applications folder and delete all those iMovie source files, it’s time to get trick, and a bit advanced.

Here’s five things that you can do to get rid of hard drive bloat, if you dare.

Delete User Cache Files

Saving space on your Mac hard drive is a key strategy, especially when you’re using a Macbook Air, with it’s strictly solid state drive (SSD). Even if you’re using a desktop Mac with a hard drive that seemed like “plenty of space” when you bought it, there will come a time when you’ll be looking to save some of it for more data. Why not get rid of the non-essential stuff on your Mac’s hard drive?

When you delete apps to help recover disk space, they can leave user cache files behind. These are the files that help improve the performance of OS X and various apps that are installed on your Mac. If you’re no longer using an app, you can delete these files to free up some space. Here’s how.

In the Finder, press Command-Shift-G or click on the Go menu, selecting Go To Folder. In the resulting field, type or paste ~/Library/Caches/. This will bring up the folder that contains the user caches. Once there, you’ll want to sort the list by size, which means you’ll want to set up that window to calculate all the sizes of files and folders.

Go to the View menu and choose Show View Options, or hit Command-J on your keyboard. Click the checkbox next to Calculate All Sizes and then close the View window. Your Mac will now show a number for everything in that Finder window, including folders. Now, if you don’t already, set the window to List view, either in the View menu or with a Command-2 on the keyboard.

You’ll now see all the biggest cache files near the top of the list (if you only see the smaller files at the top, click on Size again at the top of the column), and you can delete stuff that you no longer need. Spotify can have a bigger user cache file, as can some gaming apps.

Be careful not to remove anything you think you might need, of course. If you delete something that an app you still use needs, you might see some weird stuff go on with it.

Via: OS X Daily

Delete Unwanted Speech Voices From Your Mac

Hard drive space is at a premium these days, with files getting larger and solid state drives (SSD) becoming more affordable and ubiquitous. I’m typing on a Macbook Air right now, and making sure I don’t clutter up the drive with unnecessary files is important to me.

One way to do this is to get rid of the voices that Mac OS X uses for text-to-speech. These files can take up a decent amount of space, which may well be why iOS only allows the one onboard, now that I think about it.

Anyway, if you’re not using those text-to-speech voices, you might as well clear them off your drive and save some space. Here’s how.

If you want to get rid of the whole kit and caboodle at once, launch Terminal from the Applications folder, the dock, or with an app launching system, like Alfred. Type or paste the following command:

cd /System/Library/Speech/

This will change the directory (cd) you’re focusing on to the one in which the speech files are contained. To delete them all, simply type or paste the following:

sudo rm -rf Voices/*

This will dump every single text-to-speech voice on your system, so don’t do it if you want to keep one or more voices. In that case, navigate to the /System/Library/Speech/Voices/ folder on your hard drive and delete the voices you aren’t going to use, like Cello, or Bahh. Because, really, how often do you have your Mac read to you in the sound of string instruments or sheep?

Via: OS X Daily

Check The Application Support Folder For Steam Game Files

I suppose since I’m a gamer, I assume everyone else is. If you’re not, or you don’t use the fantastic cross-platform digital gaming portal, Steam, this tip won’t apply to you. Check out the last couple of tips for great space saving ideas, instead. Or, heck, read a review or two on Cult of Mac. I hear they’re pretty good.

For you Steam gamers looking to save some space on your hard drive, there’s one place you should really look.

Go into the Finder, and open the ~/Library/Application Support/ folder. INside that folder will be a Steam folder, which may have a ton of files sitting around from games you don’t play anymore. Be sure to Calculate All Sizes in the View menu when viewing the Steam folder here, and sort by Size. You’ll see which games are weighing your hard drive down, and you’ll know which ones you can dump (these are the ones you don’t play any more).

When I checked my Steam Application Support folder, I found about 30 Gb of data in there, much of which is from games I don’t actually play anymore, like Civilization, or Sanctum. Deleting these files gave me a ton more space than I thought possible.

Another place to check is the main Application Support folder. Not all games, even Steam games, put their big files in the Steam folder. There may even be app support items in here from apps you deleted a long time ago. Take a look through this folder and dump what you can. Remember, though, that if you delete files a current app actually needs, you’ll probably break it and need to reinstall.

I found some great stuff in this folder, like support files for EVE Online, a game I haven’t played in way too long. Deleted!

Via: OS X Daily

Delete System Logs And QuickLook Cache Files

There are many files that help make your system usable, but they can build up over time. System logs, for example, keep track of usage, errors, and services running on your Mac, but unless you look at these often via an app like Console, you’ll probably not need a ton of log files taking up space on your Mac, especially if you have one with a low-volume SSD.

QuickLook cache files make your Mac feel zippy when you hit the spacebar to preview files in the Finder or Open/Save dialogs. If you can stand a bit of a wait to do this, deleting these files can save you some space as well.

Put together, you might save a decent amount of space on your hard drive, so give it a shot. Here’s how.

First up, launch Terminal from the Applications folder or your Dock, whichever is easier for you. Then, type or paste the following command into the resulting window:

sudo rm -rf /private/var/log/*

This should clean out the system logs up to and including when you run the command, so you might want to do this on a regular basis if you find it frees up a ton of space.

Now, close that Terminal window and open another. Type or paste the following command into Terminal:

sudo rm -rf /private/var/folders/

This will get rid of the QuickLook cache files, which will then start to accumulate again. This might be another regular task if space is at a premium on your Mac, and if the speed hit to QuickLook doesn’t bother you.

Each of the commands above will require you to enter your administrator password.

Via: OS X Daily

Disable SafeSleep Mode On Your Mac

Warning – this tip is fairly advanced. Use it at your own risk.

There’s a feature that debuted back in 2005, called SafeSleep. Basically, it’s a hibernation mode designed to save the current state of your running Mac, so that it can start up exactly the same way you left it when you put the Mac to sleep, even if the battery runs out and it shuts down completely.

In OS Lion, Apple introduced two new features, called Autosave and Resume which mirrors this functionality. Turning off SafeSleep, then, is really just disabling a duplicate feature. It shouldn’t affect Autosave or Resume if you’re running OS Lion or later, and it could potentially save you gigabytes of hard drive space.

Here’s how to do it, though we caution you not to do this if you’re even slightly uncomfortable with the idea.

To disable the SafeSleep mode altogether, launch Terminal and type or paste the following command:

sudo pmset hibernatemode 0

This turns off hibernation mode, disabling SafeSleep. Now you need to delete the space-eating SafeSleep image file. Type or paste the following command into Terminal:

sudo rm /var/vm/sleepimage

If your Mac is usually plugged in while sleeping, and you don’t tend to run the battery down below 20 percent, you’re never really using SafeSleep mode, anyway, so disabling it to save some space makes sense. Macs with a non-SSD in them take a little bit of time to save the SleepSave image to their hard drives, but the SSD Macs take no time at all. The potential benefit, then, on an SSD-equipped Mac is the storage space.

If you want to re-enable SafeSleep mode again, type or paste this command into Terminal to reset SafeSleep mode:

sudo pmset -a hibernatemode 3

And things should be back to the way they were.

Source: TUAW

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Five More Ways To Master Siri On Your iPhone And iPad [Feature]

No, I mean, “Green eggs and ham!”

When Siri was updated along with iOS 6, we showed you a bunch of ways to use Apple’s personal digital assistant the right way, like using punctuation and finding out the weather.

Yet time marches ever onward, and we’ve compiled yet another five tips and tricks to help you master Siri, whether you’re looking to create a secure password or just pass the time with a few laughs. Enjoy!

Easily Correct Siri Input Errors Without Getting Frustrated Have you ever had one of those Siri moments, where you ask her to search for something, and she interprets your speech incorrectly? I’m guessing all of us have, at one time or another. One thing Siri doesn’t do very well is provide for “no I meant…” error correction, at least using speech. Next time you use Siri and the result is something you didn’t expect, don’t just press the home button in frustration, but correct Siri using your iPhone or iPad keyboard instead. Let’s say you’re searching for the location of Costa Rica. YOu might say, “Where is Costa Rica?” and Siri my respond with, “I didn’t fine any places matching ‘coaster Rica’. We could hurl the iPhone or iPad down in disgust at this point, but it cost too much to do that, so let’s just do this: Tap the bubble with the incorrectly parsed text. In this case, that’s the “Where is coaster Rica” at the top. The bubble will turn into an editable text field, and you can select coaster and replace it with Costa using the iPhone or iPad keyboard. When you’ve made the correction, hit Done on the iOS keyboard, and Siri will then reply with a much better answer. Though, in my case, Siri told me where San Jose, San Jose was. Ah, Siri. Try again. Via: Reddit Tell Siri Which Audio Input To Listen To

Hands-free car stereo Siri says HI.

Talking to Siri can be either an exercise in frustration, or a miracle of modern technology, depending on your mood and how successful the Apple digital assistant is at interpreting what it is you’re asking. Typically, when you activate Siri with a long press and hold on the Home button, the input is collected via the microphone built into your iPHone or iPad.

If you have a Bluetooth accessory, though, you might not know that Siri can listen through that device as well. Here’s how to get Siri to do just that.

First, make sure that your Bluetooth accessory is connected to the iOS device you want to use to have Siri listen to for input. Not all external portable speakers, for instance, have a mic or speakerphone capabilities, so be sure you’re using one that does, like a hands-free kit in a car, or a Bluetooth earpiece.

Now, when you press and hold that Home button on your iPhone or iPad, you’ll see a glowing blue speaker icon just to the right of Siri’s typical microphone icon. Tap there, and then choose the Bluetooth device to set it as the input device.

Now Siri will listen to that device to collect your voice commands, and–if the device supports it–will give you back audio feedback (“Would you like me to search the web for coaster Rica?” Sigh.) via that device’s speakers, too.

Though, to be honest, I don’t think I could handle Siri blasting through my car stereo. Thank goodness my car is way older than the iPhone itself.

Source: Macworld

Use Siri To Generate A Super Secure Random Password

As you may know, Siri is backed by the seriously amazing knowledge web site, Wolfram Alpha, which makes dynamic computations about your search terms based on a its own collection of built-in data, special algorithms, and other secret fancy methods. Or, to put it another way: magic.

Anyway, Siri taps into Wolfram Alpha and can come up with some great stuff, like calculating tips for you, for example. Siri’s connection to Wolfram can do even more than that, like generating a secure password for you. Here’s how.

Click and hold the Home button on your Siri-enabled iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad, and say, “Wolfram password.” You can also say, “WolframAlpha password,” if that floats your boat. Either way, you’ll get a screen that will show your input to WolframAlpha as, “generate a random password.”

Below that, you’ll see the default password length of eight characters, followed your random password, along with the Whiskey-Tango-Foxtrot way of expressing it. YOu’ll then see an additional six other passwords you can use, along with some really cool info about the properties of the given password, along with a measure of your password entropy, a measure of how tricky it will be to guess the password, even with modern computing force.

Interesting tidbit: the eight character password I generated to try this out would take about 229 years to guess, if a brute force attack generated 100,000 passwords per second. Sweet! That’s got to be more secure than the one I have now! And no, I didn’t use the one in the screenshot above for anything. Sheesh.

Via: Everything iCafe

Use Siri To Add Relationships To Your Contacts For More Natural Interactions

If you’ve tried to use Siri to call or text someone, you know it’s pretty simple. Just say, for example, “Call Joe Smith,” and Siri will call the person named Joe Smith in your Contacts App.

But did you know that Siri can also identify people via their relationship to you? You can say, “Call my brother,” or “Text my daughter,” and Siri will call or text that person, provided you’ve done a little set-up in the Contacts app.

You can also use Siri to define these relationships, so you don’t even have to open Contacts. Here’s how.

Tap and hold the Home button to activate Siri, and say something like, “Joe Smith is my boss.” Siri will check your Contacts app to make sure there isn’t more than one Joe Smith. If there is more than one, you’ll have to tap the specific Joe Smith you’re talking about. Then, Siri will ask you to confirm the relationship. “OK, do you want me to remember that Joe Smith is your manager?” she’ll ask. Tap or say “Yes,” and Siri will add that relationship to the Contact you’ve defined as your own.

Go ahead and give it a try; adding relationships to your contacts is a great way to make Siri even more natural. Now all you need to do is say, “Text my boss,” and you’ll be able to tell her that you’re running late. Hooray!

Via: TechRadar

Ask Siri These Questions, Get Some Hilarious Answers

One of my daughter’s favorite things to do with Siri on my iPhone, besides rename me all sorts of ridiculous names, is to ask it questions. “Siri,” she’ll say, “what is your real name?” Siri will reply with how she really doesn’t like talking about herself. Hilarious, right?

I’m almost afraid to show her this tip, then, because she’ll now have a ton of questions to ask Siri, getting truly funny and cute responses along the way. I may never get my iPhone back.

Here is a list of some of the best, but we’ll leave finding out the answers to you, and your own version of Siri.

Ask Siri the following questions and she’ll give you a wry or self-referential answer. The song one is my personal favorite.

* Can you make me a sandwich?
* Take me to your leader
* Sing a song
* Beam me up
* Open the pod bay doors
* I can do this all day long
* I need to hide a body
* Talk dirty to me
* How much wood could a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood?
* Who’s on first?
* What’s the answer to the Universe?

The following will get you some interesting, funny answers from Wolfram Alpha, Siri’s data source. Apparently data algorithms have a sense of humor, as well, though it runs toward the geeky, Sheldon variety.

* Where do babies come from?
* When will the world end?
* Is Santa Claus real?
* When will pigs fly?

And for the directly humorous, and down-right groan worthy fans among us, ask Siri the following questions. Be prepared to slap your knee!

* Tell me a joke
* Knock knock
* Testing 1 2 3
* You’re funny
* Set 5 AM alarm followed by Cancel 5 AM alarm

My current rename by my daughter? Siri now calls me “Adora Basil Winterpock.” Thanks, Wreck It Ralph.

Source: About.com
Image: Wired

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Five More Ways To Master Siri On Your iPhone And iPad [Feature]

Use Siri To Add Relationships To Your Contacts For More Natural Interactions [iOS Tips]

If you’ve tried to use Siri to call or text someone, you know it’s pretty simple. Just say, for example, “Call Joe Smith,” and Siri will call the person named Joe Smith in your Contacts App.

But did you know that Siri can also identify people via their relationship to you? You can say, “Call my brother,” or “Text my daughter,” and Siri will call or text that person, provided you’ve done a little set-up in the Contacts app.

You can also use Siri to define these relationships, so you don’t even have to open Contacts. Here’s how.

Tap and hold the Home button to activate Siri, and say something like, “Joe Smith is my boss.” Siri will check your Contacts app to make sure there isn’t more than one Joe Smith. If there is more than one, you’ll have to tap the specific Joe Smith you’re talking about. Then, Siri will ask you to confirm the relationship. “OK, do you want me to remember that Joe Smith is your manager?” she’ll ask. Tap or say “Yes,” and Siri will add that relationship to the Contact you’ve defined as your own.

Go ahead and give it a try; adding relationships to your contacts is a great way to make Siri even more natural. Now all you need to do is say, “Text my boss,” and you’ll be able to tell her that you’re running late. Hooray!

Via: TechRadar

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See the article here:

Use Siri To Add Relationships To Your Contacts For More Natural Interactions [iOS Tips]

Save Space On Your Hard Drive – Disable SafeSleep Mode On Your Mac [OS X Tips]

Warning – this tip is fairly advanced. Use it at your own risk.

There’s a feature that debuted back in 2005, called SafeSleep. Basically, it’s a hibernation mode designed to save the current state of your running Mac, so that it can start up exactly the same way you left it when you put the Mac to sleep, even if the battery runs out and it shuts down completely.

In OS Lion, Apple introduced two new features, called Autosave and Resume which mirrors this functionality. Turning off SafeSleep, then, is really just disabling a duplicate feature. It shouldn’t affect Autosave or Resume if you’re running OS Lion or later, and it could potentially save you gigabytes of hard drive space.

Here’s how to do it, though we caution you not to do this if you’re even slightly uncomfortable with the idea.

To disable the SafeSleep mode altogether, launch Terminal and type or paste the following command:

sudo pmset hibernatemode 0

This turns off hibernation mode, disabling SafeSleep. Now you need to delete the space-eating SafeSleep image file. Type or paste the following command into Terminal:

sudo rm /var/vm/sleepimage

If your Mac is usually plugged in while sleeping, and you don’t tend to run the battery down below 20 percent, you’re never really using SafeSleep mode, anyway, so disabling it to save some space makes sense. Macs with a non-SSD in them take a little bit of time to save the SleepSave image to their hard drives, but the SSD Macs take no time at all. The potential benefit, then, on an SSD-equipped Mac is the storage space.

If you want to re-enable SafeSleep mode again, type or paste this command into Terminal to reset SafeSleep mode:

sudo pmset -a hibernatemode 3

And things should be back to the way they were.

Source: TUAW

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Excerpt from:  

Save Space On Your Hard Drive – Disable SafeSleep Mode On Your Mac [OS X Tips]

Ask Siri These Questions, Get Some Hilarious Answers [iOS Tips]

One of my daughter’s favorite things to do with Siri on my iPhone, besides rename me all sorts of ridiculous names, is to ask it questions. “Siri,” she’ll say, “what is your real name?” Siri will reply with how she really doesn’t like talking about herself. Hilarious, right?

I’m almost afraid to show her this tip, then, because she’ll now have a ton of questions to ask Siri, getting truly funny and cute responses along the way. I may never get my iPhone back.

Here is a list of some of the best, but we’ll leave finding out the answers to you, and your own version of Siri.

Ask Siri the following questions and she’ll give you a wry or self-referential answer. The song one is my personal favorite.

* Can you make me a sandwich?
* Take me to your leader
* Sing a song
* Beam me up
* Open the pod bay doors
* I can do this all day long
* I need to hide a body
* Talk dirty to me
* How much wood could a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood?
* Who’s on first?
* What’s the answer to the Universe?

The following will get you some interesting, funny answers from Wolfram Alpha, Siri’s data source. Apparently data algorithms have a sense of humor, as well, though it runs toward the geeky, Sheldon variety.

* Where do babies come from?
* When will the world end?
* Is Santa Claus real?
* When will pigs fly?

And for the directly humorous, and down-right groan worthy fans among us, ask Siri the following questions. Be prepared to slap your knee!

* Tell me a joke
* Knock knock
* Testing 1 2 3
* You’re funny
* Set 5 AM alarm followed by Cancel 5 AM alarm

My current rename by my daughter? Siri now calls me “Adora Basil Winterpock.” Thanks, Wreck It Ralph.

Source: About.com

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Save Space On Your Hard Drive – Delete System Logs And QuickLook Cache Files [OS X Tips]

There are many files that help make your system usable, but they can build up over time. System logs, for example, keep track of usage, errors, and services running on your Mac, but unless you look at these often via an app like Console, you’ll probably not need a ton of log files taking up space on your Mac, especially if you have one with a low-volume SSD.

QuickLook cache files make your Mac feel zippy when you hit the spacebar to preview files in the Finder or Open/Save dialogs. If you can stand a bit of a wait to do this, deleting these files can save you some space as well.

Put together, you might save a decent amount of space on your hard drive, so give it a shot. Here’s how.

First up, launch Terminal from the Applications folder or your Dock, whichever is easier for you. Then, type or paste the following command into the resulting window:

sudo rm -rf /private/var/log/*

This should clean out the system logs up to and including when you run the command, so you might want to do this on a regular basis if you find it frees up a ton of space.

Now, close that Terminal window and open another. Type or paste the following command into Terminal:

sudo rm -rf /private/var/folders/

This will get rid of the QuickLook cache files, which will then start to accumulate again. This might be another regular task if space is at a premium on your Mac, and if the speed hit to QuickLook doesn’t bother you.

Each of the commands above will require you to enter your administrator password.

Via: OS X Daily

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Save Space On Your Hard Drive – Delete System Logs And QuickLook Cache Files [OS X Tips]