iOS 7 Beta 2 Adds Support For iPad 2, Retina iPad & iPad Mini

As we predicted, iOS 7 Beta 2 dropped for developers today, but substantially, it’s the first iOS 7 beta to support the iPad 2, Retina iPad and iPad mini.

We’ve already seen official shots of what iOS 7 looks like running on the iPad, as well as shots of iOS 7 running on Xcode’s iPad emulator. Now, though, we’ll get to finally see it running on a real device.

Here are the direct download links:

iOS 7 beta 2 Downloads

iPad (4th generation Model A1458) iPad (4th generation Model A1459) iPad (4th generation Model A1460) iPad mini (Model A1432) iPad mini (Model A1454) iPad mini (Model A1455) iPad Wi-Fi (3rd generation) iPad Wi-Fi + Cellular (model for ATT) iPad Wi-Fi + Cellular (model for Verizon) iPad 2 Wi-Fi (Rev A) iPad 2 Wi-Fi iPad 2 Wi-Fi + 3G (GSM) iPad 2 Wi-Fi + 3G (CDMA)

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iOS 7 Beta 2 Adds Support For iPad 2, Retina iPad & iPad Mini

Apple Releases iOS 7 Beta For iPad And iPad Mini

Along with the iOS 7 beta 2 update for iPhone, Apple also seeded the first beta of iOS 7 for iPad and iPad mini.

iOS 7 beta 2 supports the iPad 2 and newer generations. Developers can find the new beta links in the Dev Center, or use the direct links below:

OS 7 beta 2 Downloads

iPad (4th generation Model A1458) iPad (4th generation Model A1459) iPad (4th generation Model A1460) iPad mini (Model A1432) iPad mini (Model A1454) iPad mini (Model A1455) iPad Wi-Fi (3rd generation) iPad Wi-Fi + Cellular (model for ATT) iPad Wi-Fi + Cellular (model for Verizon) iPad 2 Wi-Fi (Rev A) iPad 2 Wi-Fi iPad 2 Wi-Fi + 3G (GSM) iPad 2 Wi-Fi + 3G (CDMA)

Source: Apple

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Apple Releases iOS 7 Beta For iPad And iPad Mini

Apple Releases iOS 7 Beta 2 To Developers

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The iOS 7 beta 2 just drop today – true to our prediction – and  is now available to developers. The first iPs and iPad mini betas for iOS 7 were also released this morning. The update can be installed over the air or downloaded directly from the Dev Center

Here are the download links:

iOS 7 beta 2 Downloads

iPad (4th generation Model A1458) iPad (4th generation Model A1459) iPad (4th generation Model A1460) iPad mini (Model A1432) iPad mini (Model A1454) iPad mini (Model A1455) iPad Wi-Fi (3rd generation) iPad Wi-Fi + Cellular (model for ATT) iPad Wi-Fi + Cellular (model for Verizon) iPad 2 Wi-Fi (Rev A) iPad 2 Wi-Fi iPad 2 Wi-Fi + 3G (GSM) iPad 2 Wi-Fi + 3G (CDMA) iPhone 5 (Model A1428) iPhone 5 (Model A1429) iPhone 4S iPhone 4 (GSM Rev A) iPhone 4 (GSM) iPhone 4 (CDMA) iPod touch (5th generation) Mobile Device Installer Package

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More updates coming as we dive into the new beta. Check back for updates.

The post Apple Releases iOS 7 Beta 2 To Developers appeared first on Cult of Mac.

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Apple Releases iOS 7 Beta 2 To Developers

Photosmith 3.0: Sort, Sync And Tag Your Lightroom Photos, Right There On Your iPad

Lightroom-using, iPad-owning readers might remember an app called Photosmith. It promised to let you sync your photos ’twixt iPad and Lightroom and let you add tags, keywords and metadata, as well as selecting picks and rejecting the crud before syncing everything back again.

The trouble was, it was confusing as hell, and crashed every few button taps. Now we have version 3.0, and it is everything the original tried to be. In fact, it’s pretty great.

Existing users can grab the app for free, which is good as the previous versions certainly weren’t worth the $20 price. The basics of the app are as follows (you’ll need to be running Lightroom on the same Wi-Fi network as the iPad running Photosmith, and you should have installed the free LR plugin):

The sync works both ways, so you can either create a Publish collection on yur Mac and sync it to the iPad (pictures stay in Photosmith and don’t touch the Camera Roll), or you can import photos to the iPad (from your camera via camera connection kit) and go from there.

Then, you just flip through the photos (in loupe, grid or fullscreen views) and add keywords, star ratings and color labels. If you’re running LR4 or later, you can also set the “pick” and “reject” flags.

When you’re done, you sync with Lightroom again and the changes are all synced up. This part is really quick – the initial sync can tie a bit longer as you need to transfer the JPG previews over the network.

The main differences are that a) the app is not longer confusing; b) it doesn’t crash nearly as often as before (it has died on me only once so far); and c) it’s now a joy to use. Even on the iPad mini it speeds along, letting you very quickly tag and rate the photos.

Speaking of tagging, the interface actually makes it easier to do in Photosmith than in Lightroom. You can quickly create new tags, make trees or hierarchical tags (People>The Lady) and apply tags to multiple photos at once.

There’s a lot more here too. You can import photos to Photosmith from the camera roll, or you can link them (saving space). You can also create collections and even work with Dropbox and other online storage services. I’m still digging in to the rest of the app, but from what I see so far, even the basic stuff is worth the $20 price.

Source: iTunes

Source: Photosmith

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Photosmith 3.0: Sort, Sync And Tag Your Lightroom Photos, Right There On Your iPad

Apple Unveils Redesigned 802.11ac AirPort Base Stations [WWDC 2013]

To work with Apple’s new 802.11ac MacBooks, Apple is releasing totally redesigned AirPort base stations.

Although the new AirPort is tiny, only 4-inches, it packs a lot of functionality, including 3-stream 802.11ac Wi-Fi, simultaneous dual-band, a beamforming antenna array and the option of either a 2TB or 3TB hard drive.

Price and release haven’t yet been announced, but these look like great updates.

The post Apple Unveils Redesigned 802.11ac AirPort Base Stations [WWDC 2013] appeared first on Cult of Mac.

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Mophie Unveils Juice Pack Plus For iPhone 5, Its Biggest Battery Case Yet

The iPhone 5 already has a pretty decent battery — at least mine does — but because it’s non-removable, there’s no easy way to bring it back to life if the battery dies when you’re out and about. It’s best to make sure, then, that this doesn’t happen — and Mophie’s new Juice Pack Plus can help you with that.

Featuring a large 2,100mAh battery, it’s Mophie’s most powerful battery case to date, and it promises to give your iPhone 5 an additional 120% of battery life.

That’s one complete charge from 0%, plus an extra 20% to keep you going even longer. I don’t know about you, but that would probably give me a good three to four days of use before I had to charge my iPhone or my Juice Pack Plus at all.

But of course, these battery cases aren’t aimed at average users like me; they’re aimed at power users who have their iPhone in their hand almost every minute of every day, who use their device so much they don’t get a full day of energy.

So here’s what 2,100mAh means to those users. You’ll get an additional 10 hours of talk time on 3G, an additional 10 hours of Internet browsing over 3G or LTE, an additional 12 hours of Internet browsing over Wi-Fi, or up to 50 hours of music playback.

Like all good battery cases, the Juice Pack Plus has LED lights on its back to tell you how much energy it has left, and it’s protective, too — with a dual-texture, rubberized, shock-resistant band around its edge that’ll keep your iPhone safe during those inevitable drops.

The Juice Pack plus comes in three colors — there’s a black one that’s shipping in 1-2 days, a white model that ships on May 22, and a (PRODUCT) RED model that ships on May 31. All three are priced at $119.95 and are available to order from Mophie now.

Source: Mophie

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iPhone Interference Blamed For Sending Airliner Off Course

Wireless interference from an iPhone has been blamed for disrupting the compasses on a regional airliner and sending pilots several miles off course. The incident happened on a 2011 flight as it climbed past 9,000 feet, but the issue was resolved when a flight attendant asked a passenger to turn their iPhone off.

“The timing of the cellphone being turned off coincided with the moment where our heading problem was solved,” the unidentified co-pilot told NASA’s Aviation Safety Reporting System.

Many have called for the FAA to relax restrictions on electronic devices — such as smartphones, tablets, and laptops — during flights. Several public figures, including U.S. Senator Clair McCaskill, believe existing rules are excessive and ”ridiculous.”

This has led to the FAA appointing an advisory committee from the airline and technology industries to make recommendations on how it could broaden the use of electronics during flights. Those recommendations are expected this July.

But pilot reports and scientific studies suggest that today’s restrictions may be necessary, after all. Bloomberg reports “government and airline reporting systems have logged dozens of cases in which passenger electronics were suspected of interfering with navigation, radios and other aviation equipment.”

Laboratory tests have shown that some devices broadcast radio waves powerful enough to interfere with airline equipment, according to NASA, Boeing, and the U.K.’s Civil Aviation Authority.

Furthermore, the FAA believes the risk of interference from personal electronics is increasing as the U.S. aviation industry adopts satellite-based navigation to improve efficiency and allow planes to fly closer together using GPS.

Airlines have been divided on the subject. Delta, which reported 27 suspected incidents of electronic interference causing aircraft malfunctions between 2010 to 2012, welcomes relaxed restrictions because it’s what passengers want.

Four in ten passengers surveyed last December said that they want to be able to use electronics at anytime throughout flights.

United said that it would prefer no change because new rules could be difficult for flight attendants to enforce.

CTIA, an international non-profit trade association representing the wireless communications industry, and Amazon have urged the FAA to relax existing rules, and they insist that personal electronics don’t cause interference.

Existing rules prohibit the use of most personal electronics while a plane is below 10,000 feet. Above that altitude, devices can be used as long as they are in “airplane mode” and wireless radios are switched off — though they can still connect to in-flight Wi-Fi networks.

Source: Bloomberg

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iPhone Interference Blamed For Sending Airliner Off Course

Boingo App For iOS Now Allows You To Buy Wi-Fi With In-App Purchases

The Boingo app for iOS now allows users to buy Wi-Fi using in-app purchases that are charged to your iTunes account. It makes it quicker and easier to get connected on your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch, and means you no longer have to navigate Boingo’s website.

There is a catch, though. Not only is the in-app purchase 4¢ more expensive than the regular Boingo subscription at $7.99, but it’s also iOS-only, providing unlimited connectivity on any iOS device. So subscriptions paid for using an in-app purchase won’t work on your notebook, Android-powered devices, or anything else you might want to use it on.

This limitation is presumably to make up for the 30% cut Apple will take on every in-app purchase Boingo sells, and for some users — those who want the subscription purely for use on an iOS device — it may not be an issue. But it does encourage those who want to use the subscription on other devices to sidestep the in-app purchase (and therefore Apple’s 30% cut) and buy online.

Boingo’s iOS app also gives you the option to set up a recurring in-app purchase that’ll automatically bill you for your subscription every month. Unfortunately, however, there’s no option to purchase quarterly or yearly subscriptions at a discount.

Y0u’ll find the latest version of Boingo for iOS in the App Store now.

Source: BusinessWire

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Mastering iTunes: Use A Password To Protect Shared Music and Movies [OS X Tips]

If you share your songs and movies via iTunes on your home network, you might not want just any old people to access your shared media or playlists, even if you let them onto your Wi-Fi. While iTunes lets you share all the types of media it can serve up, maybe your kids or office mates don’t need to listen to those hardcore rap tunes.

It’s fairly easy to protect your shared items with a password, using the iTunes Preferences. Here’s how to do just that.

Launch iTunes, and then open Preferences from the iTunes menu, or hit Command-Comma on your keyboard. Click on the Sharing tab at the top, and (as long as Sharing is enabled, of course) click on either the “Share entire library” radio button, or the “Share selected playlists” button. If you choose the latter, click on the checkboxes next to the specific media or playlists you’d like to share. That way you can just share music, or movies, or iTunes TV shows, if you like.

Once that’s taken care of, click on the “Require password” checkbox, and type in a password that you’ll remember, and you’ll be able to share with the folks you’d like to give access to. Or keep it to yourself for private iTunes sharing, you selfish meanie. Don’t use your Mac’s admin password or any other secure password that you don’t want to share. When finished, click on OK.

That’s all there is to it. Anyone who is on the same network as you will be able to share the library or playlists you’ve enabled, but only if they have the password you set up.

Via: OS X Daily

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Mastering iTunes: Use A Password To Protect Shared Music and Movies [OS X Tips]