European Probe of Apple’s Irish Tax Policies Extended to 2016

A decision in the European Commission probe of Ireland’s alleged „sweetheart tax deal“ with Apple will likely be delayed until after the Irish elections in early 2016, as Financial Times reports the executive cabinet has now requested supplementary questionnaires in the lengthy investigation.

The European Commission began Apple’s Irish tax probe in June 2014, and the Brussels-based executive body formally accused the iPhone maker of receiving illegal state aid from Ireland in September 2014. A decision was originally expected earlier this year, but the additional information requested will likely cause further delays.

Apple’s tax policies have been scrutinized on numerous occasions over the past three years, as the company is said to utilize multiple subsidiary companies located in the Irish city of Cork to move money around without significant tax penalties. Apple continues to deny any wrongdoing, and Ireland vows to take the European Commission to court over any negative ruling, according to the report.

Apple’s Irish tax probe is part of a larger crackdown by the European Commission on possible corporate tax avoidance in EU countries. Earlier this month, the commission reportedly accused McDonald’s of „benefiting from arrangements that allowed it to pay no tax on European royalties in Luxembourg,“ and Fiat and Starbucks were ordered in October to repay up to €30 million in back taxes.

Tags: Apple, European Union, corporate tax, European Commission, Ireland
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European Probe of Apple’s Irish Tax Policies Extended to 2016